PUBPOL 259S | WOMEN AS LEADERS

Instructor(s):Alexandra Zagbayou

TuTh 10:15 a.m. - 11:30 a.m. | Sanford 150

Explore the long history of women’s activism in the United States, and how that history has shaped current debates about women leaders. Explore the variety of ways that women exercise leadership not just in party politics and corporations, but in neighborhoods, schools, and unions among other places. Learn about theories of leadership, and connect theory to practice through the process of exercising leadership on campus through a hands-on final project. Both men and women welcome in the class.


PUBPOL 270S | LEAD THE WAY DURHAM: CIVIC ENGAGEMENT, SOCIAL INNOVATION, AND COMMUNITY LEADERSHIP IN THE BULL CITY

Instructor(s):Alexandra Zagbayou

TuTh 12:00 p.m. - 1:15 p.m. | Sanford 150

This course will facilitate the exercise of innovative leadership to address important social and civic needs in Durham. We will explore and shape democracy through grassroots work by engaging with issues of participation, citizenship, equity, justice, and well-being in the Durham community. Learning about Durham’s history and with the goal of helping create positive change, students will identify a need, garner the necessary resources, and develop a context specific solution to address this need for the service-learning component of the course. Through active participation and mindful reflection, students will have the opportunity to shape and refine their personal models of social change.


PUBPOL 290S / ENG 290S | PLAYS THAT CHANGE THE WORLD

Instructor(s):Faulkner Fox

Tu 3:30 p.m. - 6:00 p.m. | Allen 317

The goal of this creative writing course is for aspiring playwrights to think deeply about what—exactly—they are trying to do, and avoid, in their writing.  What causes a play to be heavy-handed and propagandistic, as opposed to impassioned?  How can students who believe deeply in a particular issue write artful drama about that issue?  In what ways is theater similar—and dissimilar—to social protest in the streets?  Students will be encouraged to experiment, question, and revise, at every turn.

This course will closely examine a diversity of plays that have had a marked impact on their cultures—an impact beyond an excellent and meaningful theater-going experience.  Recent examples we will study include Pass Over by Antoinette Nwandu and The Talk by local playwright Sonny Kelly. We will also watch and study more traditional plays like The Crucible and Angels in America.

Over the course of the semester, students will read—and watch—excellent political plays as well as write their own.  They will write and develop their own full-length script, in addition to doing weekly creative responses to produced plays.  Class discussion will be divided between focus on student work-in-progress, produced plays, and playwriting craft. Most weeks, we will run scenes (have students read aloud from other students’ scripts-in-progress).  Outside of class, students will work in small groups, meet with alumni readers, consultants at the Writing Studio, and individually with me.  Grading will be as follows: 50% development, drafting, and revision of the student’s own play, 25% written comments on plays, and 25% participation in other aspects of the class such as one-on-one discussion with me and with peers, small group run-throughs of scenes-in-progress.


PUBPOL 311S / ETHICS 301S / ICS 317S / POLSCI 341S / RIGHTS 301S | BUSINESS AND HUMAN RIGHTS ADVOCACY LAB

Instructor(s):Suzanne Katzenstein

W 1:45 p.m. - 4:15 p.m. | Friedl Bldg 216

An exploration of human rights advocacy from a legal, political science and comparative perspective. Will focus on issues related to corporate accountability. A core component of the course will include a human rights “lab” in which students work in teams on policy-oriented projects, potentially in collaboration with community partners.


PUBPOL 415S | COMMUNITIES OF PRACTICE

Instructor(s):Andrew Nurkin

TuTh 3:30 p.m. - 4:45 p.m. | Sanford 07

Capstone course for students completing community-based research projects through Service Opportunities in Leadership, a signature curricular and experiential learning offering in the Hart Leadership Program. Course involves critical reflection on summer projects, exploration of leadership models that center community-led work and systemic analysis, development and practice of skills for lifelong civic leadership, and interrogation of how individual lives of commitment to the common good are formed and sustained in community with others. Instructor consent required. Students must be members of the SOL program and have completed both PUBPOL 263 and an approved summer project.


PUBPOL 816 / GLHLTH 840 | ETHICS AND POLICY-MAKING

Instructor(s):Jay Pearson

TuTh 12:00 p.m. - 1:15 p.m. | Sanford 05

Normative concepts in politics, liberty, justice, and the public interest: historical and philosophical roots, relationship to one another and to American political tradition, and implications for domestic and international problems. Department consent required.