From Bruce’s Early History: “From the beginning, I had been in favor of the ‘leadership’ designation for the program because I thought it was a way to reach out to the large number of Duke students who in one way or another saw (and see) themselves as leaders: people planning careers in business, medicine, the military, politics, government, and the non-profit world. I was pleased to be able to give special assistance to the political and environmental activists, and pleased that their presence in the program would challenge or involve other, less civically concerned students…

John’s view was that the activists should be the center of the program, and that training in a highly egalitarian style of community organizing should be at the heart of our pedagogy. The disagreement was never really settled, but after that semester, we worked out a compromise that let John work with the most ardent activists while I worked more closely with the others.

And the Leadership Program became a lightning rod for disagreement in another way around the same time, leading efforts against Duke’s plans to replace some poor people’s housing near the university with new academic facilities. Although this disagreement was eventually settled fairly, with substantial relocation assistance, the program was developing something of a reputation for controversy.”