Meet the 2013-2014 Hart Fellows

The faculty and staff of the Hart Leadership Program are pleased to announce the 2013-2014 Hart Fellows. These three outstanding Duke seniors were selected based on their strong leadership skills, their creative minds, and their proven commitment to service. For their ten-month fellowships, the Hart Fellows will work with innovative organizations facing complex humanitarian, political, social, or environmental issues in the developing world. They will complete community-based research projects in partnership with their host organizations, while simultaneously developing leadership capacity as they learn to navigate their new surroundings.

 

Grace Zhou

Grace Zhou

 

 

Grace Zhou, class of 2013, is originally from New York, New York. She will graduate with a major in Public Policy, a minor in Spanish, and a certificate in Global Health. On campus, Grace has served as a lead Peer Adviser and worked with the Trinity Deans and the Academic Advising Center to plan Freshmen Orientation and the Sophomore Academic Homecoming. In 2010, she co-founded ASPIRE, an after-school program which uses a games-based curriculum to engage underprivileged youth in Durham.  Grace has also been an active member of Duke Debate, qualifying for two World Universities Debating Championships.  In the summer of 2011, Grace traveled to Naama, Uganda on a joint Civic Summer Research Fellowship and Service Opportunities in Leadership Fellowship to complete a community-based research project on orphans and vulnerable children.   After returning to Duke, she completed her honors thesis in Public Policy on orphans and vulnerable children, and worked as a research assistant on the Cambodia Orphan Project Evaluation (COPE).  For her Hart Fellowship, Grace will work in Battambang, Cambodia, with Homeland, a local non-governmental organization dedicated to providing sustainable care for orphans and vulnerable children.

Jocelyn Streid

Jocelyn Streid

Jocelyn Streid, class of 2013, is an English major from Saint Louis, Missouri. A Robertson Scholar and a member of Phi Beta Kappa, Jocelyn plans to pursue a career as a physician engaged in the intersections of narrative, theology, and healthcare. During her time at Duke, her interest in community health, preventative care, and palliative medicine led her to internships and research projects in India, China, South Africa, the United Kingdom, Saint Louis, and rural Kentucky. She spent the summer before her senior year at the Cicely Saunders Institute for Palliative Care at King’s College, London, where she authored on a paper on palliative care in sub-Saharan Africa. Jocelyn has presented her research at conferences in Uppsala, Sweden, and St. Louis, Missouri, and produced a radio piece on the intersection of spirituality and smoking cessation that aired on NPR affiliate stations in four states. As the 2013 Student Preacher, Jocelyn delivered a sermon in Duke Chapel about decision-making at the end of life. At Duke, Jocelyn has been involved with the Undergraduate Conduct Board, the Duke Colloquium, CruCares, Duke Chapel PathWays, and Round Table, and for several years volunteered at Duke Hospital and the Durham County Jail. Jocelyn will spend her fellowship year in Kuching, Malaysia, conducting pediatric palliative care research with the Sarawak Children’s Cancer Society.

Lewis Purcell

Lewis Purcell

Lewis Purcell, class of 2013, grew up splitting his time between Mississippi, Texas, and Russia. He will graduate with a double major in Russian and History. On campus, Lewis has been very involved with a campus ministry, the Reformed University Fellowship, and Duke Chapel Scholars, through which he tried to serve and love fellow students and the surrounding Durham community. In 2012, he participated in Duke’s first ever Duke Immerse program focusing on the comparative history of South Africa’s antiapartheid struggle and America’s Civil Rights Movement. This program changed his life through in-depth discussion of race, justice and oppression and through the diverse and challenging relationships he formed with his peers on the program.  Since the beginning of high school, Lewis has worked most every summer at Camp Butterfly, a camp for disabled children in St. Petersburg, Russia. His first experience there altered his life more than anything before or since, and he feels most fulfilled when he is actively a part of this community, loving its too-often neglected members and working to help them help themselves. Somehow throughout his time at Duke he managed to find funding to be able to attend camp each summer. Lewis is ecstatic about this chance to work even more closely with this community, and, for the first time ever, truly give himself fully to this work.