HIST 195S.06 - LEADERSHIP IN AMERICAN HISTORY

Tu, Thu 3:55-5:10PM, Soc/Psych 128

Instructor: Gerald Wilson

By using examples from American History this seminar will examine characteristics of leaders and the decision-making process. Attention will be given ethical issues involved in both the process and the product of decision making. (permission from instructor required).

HIST 97D - AMERICAN DREAMS/AMERICAN REALITIES

Mon, Wed, Fri 11:50-12:40PM Soc/Psych 139.

Instructor: Gerald Wilson

This course examines the role of such myths as “Rags to Riches”, “City on a Hill”, “The Frontier and Agrarian myths” and the “Foreign Devil” in defining the American character and determining the hopes, fears, dreams and actions of people throughout American History. Attention will be given to the surface consistency of these myths as accepted by each immigrant group versus the shifting content of the myths as they change to reflect the hopes and values of these groups.

PPS 264S.02 - LEADERSHIP AS A MORAL ACTIVITY

Tu, Thu 3:50-5:05PM, Sanford 150

Instructor: James A. Joseph

This course will be an examination of ethics in public life with particular attention to public values that transform communities and empower leaders. Using case studies from actual experiences in government, business and civil society, each student will be asked to develop a framework/set of principles for making public policy decisions. (permission from instructor required).

PPS 195.38 - PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICES OF EFFECTIVE STUDENT LEADERSHIP

Mon 3:55-6:25PM, Sanford 150

Instructor: Larry Moneta

This course will examine the issues, strategies and competencies which characterize effective student leadership. Designed for students currently in or aspiring to leadership roles, the course will cover topics to include: leadership traits and personal competencies, group and team development, coalitions and community relationships, values and moral considerations, conflict management, and the notion of leading diverse organizations. Students will engage in case studies, individual and team projects and written assignments.

PPS 177S - ADVANCED DOCUMENTARY PHOTOGRAPHY

Mon 7:00-9:00PM, Lyndhurst 001

Instructor: Alex Harris

An advanced course for students who have taken Public Policy Studies 176S or have had substantial experience in documentary fieldwork. Students complete an individual photographic project and study important works within the documentary tradition. Prerequisite: Visual Arts 118S, Public Policy Studies 176S, or consent of instructor.

PPS 176S.02 - AMERICAN COMMUNITIES: A DOCUMENTARY APPROACH

Mon 3:50-6:20PM. Lyndhurst 001

Instructor: Alex Harris

A seminar in the theory and practice of documentary photography. Each student will choose a community outside the university and complete a semester-long documentary photographic study of that community. The class will also examine and discuss the documentary tradition and classic documentary books while at the same time emphasizing the photographs produced by the students. (permission from instructor required).

PPS 146 - LEADERSHIP, DEVELOPMENT AND ORGANIZATIONS

Tu, Thu 2:15-3:30PM, Sanford 03

Instructor: Tony Brown

Effective leadership processes in different types of organizations and situations. Focus on ethical leadership behavior. Topics range from ethics, citizenship, and the meaning of a great society to “defining moments” of individual ethical behavior in leadership situations. Course includes an important service learning project in Durham, along with reflection on the ethical leadership experience.

PPS 145 - LEADERSHIP, POLICY AND CHANGE

Tu, Th 2:15-3:30PM, Sanford 102

Instructor: Bruce Payne

Ethical and practical issues of social and organizational change, including conflicts about power and authority, violence, gender, race, fairness, wealth and work. How imagination, fictional and historical narratives, anger, friendship, and teaching skills can be useful in working for change. Problems of group dynamics, integrity, responsibility, and self-understanding faced by those supporting or opposing changes.

PPS 140 - WOMEN AS LEADERS

Wed 3:55-6:25 PM, Sanford 150

Instructor: Betsy Alden

Intellectual and experiential exploration of the theory and practice of leadership, with an emphasis on the special role gender plays. Topics include: authority, conflict, power, and an assessment of each student’s potential for leadership. This is a Service-Learning course, which also requires mentoring at-risk middle school girls on Monday or Tuesday afternoon from 2:30-4:30. Small group work required.

PPS 137 - INTEGRATING COMMUNITY AND CLASSROOM

Wed 5:30-8:00PM, Sanford 04

Instructor: Alma Blount

Interns integrate what they have learned from their summer work in community-based organizations with formal study of concepts of service, social change, citizenship, and leadership, researching a social policy issue identified as relevant to each student’s community internship experience. Consideration of how lives of commitment to the common good are formed and sustained. Prerequisite: completion of Hart Leadership Program Summer Internship.

PPS 116 - POLICY CHOICE AS VALUE CONFLICT (lecture)

Tu, Th 12:40-1:55 PM, Sanford 04. Tu, Th 12:40-1:55 PM, Sanford 04

Instructor: Bruce Payne

This class is one of the core courses in the Public Policy Studies curriculum. Focused on ethics in public life, it asks how conscience, character, and varieties of moral reasoning can help in facing corruption, deception, war, and social injustice. Readings and discussion from political theory, fiction, and history.

PPS 105S - THE DOCUMENTARY EXPERIENCE: A VIDEO APPROACH

Wed 1:30-3:10; Wed 7:00-10:00 PM, Lyndhurst 007

Instructor: Gary Hawkins

A documentary approach to the study of local communities through video production projects assigned by the course instructor. The Fall 2003 theme is “The Nature of the Contest.” We will collectively explore the following questions: What is the meaning and value of competition in a chosen spectrum of American lives?

What will Americans do to win? How will one’s desire to win affect his ethics? What is a true victory vs. a hollow victory? What sacrifices will a person make, and what obstacles is he or she willing to tackle? We will also examine the documentary tradition though screenings of classic and contemporary films, laying heavy emphasis on cinematic technique and its use in non-fiction storytelling. Several exercises, video and otherwise, will be used to focus the research. Consent of instructor required.

ARTHIST 102S - THE VISUAL ARTS: CONTEMPORARY VISIONS

Instructor: David Little

Using the city as a classroom without walls, this peripatetic examination of contemporary art on view in New York City looks at what seems most interesting and noteworthy in recent work, and tries to come to terms with a wide array of styles and intentions. We spend some time on the dominant institutions: The Museum of Modern Art, The Metropolitan Museum, the Guggenheim, the Whitney, as well as leading commercial galleries and alternative spaces.

While direct experiences of visual art are part of every session, topics for discussion range across art history, museum studies, sociology, and public policy. [Areas of Knowledge: AL, CZ; Inquiries/Competencies: IAA]

MUSIC 163 - OPERA AT THE METROPOLITAN

Instructor: Robert Bucker

Students in this course study most of the works in the spring season of New York’s opera companies. Classes prepare for these works and analyze them after the performances. Course focuses on the way composers and writers manage to tell significant stories in ways that are powerful and memorable. [Areas of Knowlege: AL; Competencies/Inquiries: IAA]

PPS 153S.01 - LEADERSHIP, ETHICS, AND DRAMA

Instructor: Bruce Payne

Includes attending at least two plays or operas per week; study of the texts of several of these works, along with essays by philosophers and political theorists; regular discussions and weekly papers. Topics include dilemmas of individual choice and public choice, conflicts, conflicts of race and ethnicity, gender and sexuality, fairness and social injustice, loyalty and betrayal, and the moral and psychological dimensions of character. [Areas of Knowledge: AL, SS; Inquiries/Competencies: EI]

HST 196.07 - LEADERSHIP IN AMERICAN HISTORY

(TTh 3:50-5:10); Room 128 Sanford.

Instructor: Gerald Wilson

Focuses on political, social, business and artistic leaders in American history and problems which have called for leadership. In addition to selected short readings, students will examine closely the following: Burns, James MacGregor Burns’ “Leadership,” Walter Clark’s, “Ox Bow Incident,” William Golding’s “Lord of the Flies,” Richard Hofstadter’s “The American Political Tradition,” Niccolo Machiarelli’s “Prince,” Robert Penn Warren’s, “All the King’s Men,” David Gergen’s “Eyewitness to Power,” and Gary Wills’ “Certain Trumpets.” Permission of the instructor required. [Areas of Knowledge: CZ; Inquiries/Competencies: EI, R]

HST 97 - AMERICAN DREAMS, AMERICAN REALITIES

(MWF 11:50-12:40); Room 139 Sanford.

Instructor: Gerald Wilson

Examines the role of such myths as “rags to riches,” “beacon to the world,” the “frontier” and the “foreign devil” in defining the American character and determining the hopes, fears, dreams and actions of people throughout American History.

In addition to selected short readings, students examine closely Arthur M. Schlesinger’s “The Disuniting of America,” David Potter’s “People of Plenty,” David Halberstam’s, “The Fifties,” Johns Hellmann’s, “American Myth and the Legacy of Viet Nam,” William Dean Howell’s “The Rise of Silas Lapham,” and Robert A. Rosenbloum and Gerald L. Wilson’s “The Value of Myth.” Lecture course, open to freshmen and sophomores only. [Areas of Knowledge: CZ; Inquiries/Competencies: CCI, IAA]

PPS 179S.01 - REINVENTING AGE: A DOCUMENTARY INQUIRY

(M 3:55-6:25); 001Lyndhurst.

Instructor: Alex Harris

America is in midst of a demographic revolution. The number of individuals over sixty-five years is growing at a rapid pace. There are few societal structures in place to accommodate those now experiencing what amounts to a new third stage of life, nearly equivalent to the middle years in duration.

This course will examine how the pioneers of this third stage are reinventing themselves into new careers or directions, many taking on leadership roles in addressing societal problems. Each student in the class will complete a semester long photographic study, focusing on individuals over sixty-five who are working to benefit society. The class will also review and discuss a selection of documentary, demographic, and literary studies related to the course theme. [Areas of Knowledge: AL, SS; Inquiries/Competencies: IAA]

PPS 196S.39 - MAKING CHANGE IN COMMUNITIES: THE WORK OF LEADERSHIP

(M 3:55-6:25); Room 150 Sanford.

Instructors: Julie Thomasson Mooney, Tema Okun

Explores leadership approaches to influencing change around tough issues facing Southern communities such as education and economic development, with a special emphasis on race and poverty. Students examine the meaning of leadership as a shared activity and explore a range of leadership approaches to creating social change, including collaboration and community organizing.

A major class project allows students to analyze a current situation in a Southern community and conceive of strategies for change in that community. [Areas of Knowledge: SS]

PPS 146.01 - LEADERSHIP, DEVELOPMENT, AND ORGANIZATIONS

(TuTh 10:55-12:10); Room 03 Sanford.

Instructor: Tony Brown

Explores the many facets of leadership, leadership development, and the processes by which enterprising people affect change in a variety of organizational situations. Ethics, character, and citizenship- are important themes throughout the course. The course emphasizes action-learning pedagogues.

Students write a personal leadership paper, define and act on an enterprising leadership project, and participate in a team-based community leadership project. Class activities also include case discussions and guest speakers. [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Inquiries/Competencies: EI]

PPS144S.01 - ENTERPRISING LEADERSHIP

(TuTh 3:50-5:05); Room 150 Sanford.

Instructor: Tony Brown

Explores the many facets of enterprising leadership by focusing on how social entrepreneurs and their associates act as social innovators. The organizational focus is on enterprises that combine a social mission with commercial strategies. Ethics, citizenship and public policy implications are important course themes.

The course includes a team project that identifies a credible idea, develops a compelling plan, and marshals resources necessary to implement a new social venture project in Durham or at Duke. Class activities include case discussions and speakers. Not open to seniors. Consent of instructor is required. [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Inquiries/Competencies: EI]

PPS 105S.01 - THE DOCUMENTARY EXPERIENCE: A VIDEO APPROACH

(W 1:00-3:10 & 7:00-9:10); 201 Lyndhurst.

Instructor: John Jackson

Explores the use of documentary film to reveal human complexity. Students will complete a ten-minute film about an individual or participants in a community distinct from his or her own, learning to closely observe and carefully reveal character and lifestyle, and to utilize video cameras and editing systems. [Areas of Knowledge: AL, SS; Inquiries/Competencies: IAA, R]

PPS 049S.01 - CIVIC PARTICIPATION/COMMUNITY LEADERSHIP

(TuTh 2:15-3:30); Room 04 Sanford.

Instructor: Alma Blount

Explores a series of questions about reinventing democracy at the grassroots. Challenges students to develop a framework of community problem-solving approaches, and to consider diverse ways to exercise leadership effectively in the face of cynicism, apathy, and competing interests. [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Inquiries/Competencies: EI]

HIST 195S.06 - LEADERSHIP IN AMERICAN HISTORY

(TTh 4:25-5:40); Soc/Psych 128

Instructor: Gerald Wilson

Focuses on political, social, business and artistic leaders in American history and problems which have called for leadership. In addition to selected short readings, students will examine closely the following: James MacGregor Burns’ “Leadership,” Walter Clark’s, “Ox Bow Incident,” William Golding’s “Lord of the Flies,” Richard Hofstadter’s “The American Political Tradition,” Niccolo Machiarelli’s “Prince,” Robert Penn Warren’s, “All the King’s Men,” David Gergen’s “Eyewitness to Power,” and Gary Wills’ “Certain Trumpets.” [Areas of Knowledge: CZ; Inquiries/Competencies: EI, R]

HIST 97D - AMERICAN DREAMS/AMERICAN REALITIES

(MonWed 11:40-12:55 with Friday discussion section); Social Sciences 139

Instructor: Gerald Wilson

Examines the role of such myths as “rags to riches,” “beacon to the world,” the “frontier” and the “foreign devil” in defining the American character and determining the hopes, fears, dreams and actions of people throughout American History.

In addition to selected short readings, students examine closely Arthur M. Schlesinger’s “The Disuniting of America,” David Potter’s “People of Plenty,” David Halberstam’s, “The Fifties,” Johns Hellmann’s, “American Myth and the Legacy of Viet Nam,” William Dean Howell’s “The Rise of Silas Lapham,” and Robert A. Rosenbloum and Gerald L. Wilson’s “The Value of Myth.” [Areas of Knowledge: CZ; Modes of Inquiry:CCI]

PPS 264S.02 - LEADERSHIP AND PUBLIC VALUES

Tu, Thu 3:50-5:05PM, Sanford 150

Instructor: James A. Joseph

This course will be an examination of ethics in public life with particular attention to public values that transform communities and empower leaders. Using case studies from actual experiences in government, business and civil society, each student will be asked to develop a framework/set of principles for making public policy decisions. (permission from instructor required). [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Modes of Inquiry:EI] crosslisted parish

PPS 166 - THE INSURGENT SOUTH

(MonWed 2:50-4:05), Sanford 03.

Instructor: Robert Korstad

Social movements in the South from Reconstruction to the present. Includes Populism, Women’s Suffrage, the Interracial Movement, labor, civil rights, and post-1960s conservatism. Attention to public policy positions espoused by social movement organizations and activists. Lecture/discussion. Weekly writing assignments. [Areas of Knowledge: CZ, SS; Modes of Inquiry:] crosslisted history.

PPS 146 - LEADERSHIP, DEVELOPMENT AND ORGANIZATIONS

(WedFri 1:15-2:30), Sanford 05

Instructor: Tony Brown

Explores the many facets of leadership, leadership development, and the processes by which enterprising people affect change in a variety of organizational situations. Ethics, character, and citizenship- are important themes throughout the course.

The course emphasizes action-learning pedagogues. Students write a personal leadership paper, define and act on an enterprising leadership project, and participate in a team-based community leadership project. Class activities also include case discussions and guest speakers. [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Modes of Inquiry:EI]

PPS 145 - LEADERSHIP, POLICY AND CHANGE

(TuTh 2:50-4:05), Sanford 102

Instructor: Bruce Payne

Ethical and practical issues of social and organizational change, including conflicts about power and authority, violence, gender, race, fairness, wealth and work. How imagination, fictional and historical narratives, anger, friendship, and teaching skills can be useful in working for change.

Problems of group dynamics, integrity, responsibility, and self-understanding faced by those supporting or opposing changes. [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Modes of Inquiry:EI]

PPS 144S - ENTERPRISING LEADERSHIP

(TuTh 4:25-5:40), Sanford 225

Instructor: Tony Brown

Explores the many facets of enterprising leadership by focusing on how social entrepreneurs and their associates act as social innovators. The organizational focus is on enterprises that combine a social mission with commercial strategies. Ethics, citizenship and public policy implications are important course themes.

The course includes a team project that identifies a credible idea, develops a compelling plan, and marshals resources necessary to implement a new social venture project in Durham or at Duke. Class activities include case discussions and speakers. Not open to seniors. Consent of instructor is required. [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Inquiries/Competencies: EI]

PPS 140 - WOMEN AS LEADERS

(Wed, 4:25-6:55), Sanford 102

Instructor: Betsy Alden

Intellectual and experiential exploration of the theory and practice of leadership, with an emphasis on the special role gender plays. Topics include: authority, conflict, power, and an assessment of each student’s potential for leadership.

This is a Service-Learning course, which also requires mentoring at-risk middle school girls on Monday or Tuesday afternoon from 2:30-4:30. Small group work required. [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Modes of Inquiry:]

PPS 137 - INTEGRATING COMMUNITY AND CLASSROOM

(Wed, 6:00-8:30), Sanford 05

Instructor: Alma Blount

Service Opportunities in Leadership Interns integrate what they have learned from their summer work in community-based organizations with formal study of concepts of service, social change, citizenship, and leadership, researching a social policy issue identified as relevant to each student’s community internship experience.

Consideration of how lives of commitment to the common good are formed and sustained. Prerequisite: completion of Hart Leadership Program Summer Internship. [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Modes of Inquiry: EI. R]

PPS 116 - POLICY CHOICE AS VALUE CONFLICT (lecture)

Bruce Payne: (TuTh 1:15-2:30 with Friday discussion section), Sanford 05. Bob Korstad: (MonWed 2:50-4:05 with Friday discussion section), Sanford 05

Instructor: Robert Korstad

Bruce Payne or Robert Korstad This class is one of the core courses in the Public Policy Studies curriculum. Focused on ethics in public life, it asks how conscience, character, and varieties of moral reasoning can help in facing corruption, deception, war, and social injustice. Readings and discussion from political theory, fiction, and history. [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Modes of Inquiry: EI]

PPS 105S - THE DOCUMENTARY EXPERIENCE: A VIDEO APPROACH

(Wed 6:15-8:45), Lyndhurst 001; (Wed 1:15-3:45), Lyndhurst 001

Instructor: Gary Hawkins

A documentary approach to the study of local communities through video production projects assigned by the course instructor. The Fall 2003 theme is “The Nature of the Contest.” We will collectively explore the following questions: What is the meaning and value of competition in a chosen spectrum of American lives?

What will Americans do to win? How will one’s desire to win affect his ethics? What is a true victory vs. a hollow victory? What sacrifices will a person make, and what obstacles is he or she willing to tackle? We will also examine the documentary tradition though screenings of classic and contemporary films, laying heavy emphasis on cinematic technique and its use in non-fiction storytelling. Several exercises, video and otherwise, will be used to focus the research. Consent of instructor required. [Areas of Knowledge: AL, SS; Modes of Inquiry: R] crosslisted: Culanth, Docst, Fvd, History, Polsci.

ARTHIST 102S.01 - THE VISUAL ARTS: CONTEMPORARY VISIONS

Instructor: TBA

Using the city as a classroom without walls, this peripatetic examination of contemporary art on view in New York City looks at what is interesting and noteworthy in recent works, and tries to come to terms with a wide array of styles and intentions. (Open to participants in the HLP’s Leadership and the Arts in New York program). [Areas of Knowledge: ALP, CZ]

MUSIC 163 - OPERA AT THE METROPOLITAN

Instructor: TBA

Students in this course study most of the works in the spring season of New York’s opera companies. Classes prepare for these works and analyze them after the performances. Course focuses on the way composers and writers manage to tell significant stories in powerful and memorable ways. (Open to participants in the HLP’s Leadership and the Arts in New York program). [Areas of Knowledge: ALP]

PUBPOL 153S.01 and 153S.02 - LEADERSHIP, ETHICS AND DRAMA

Instructor: Bruce Payne

Includes attending at least two plays or operas per week; study of the texts of several of these works, along with essays by philosophers and political theorists; regular discussions and weekly papers. Topics include dilemmas/conflicts of individual choice and public choice, race and ethnicity, gender and sexuality, fairness and social injustice, loyalty and betrayal, and the moral and psychological dimensions of character. (Open to participants in the HLP’s Leadership and the Arts in New York program). [Areas of Knowledge: ALP, SS; Modes of Inquiry: EI, W]

PUBPOL 150.01 - POLICY, PHILANTHROPY, AND THE ARTS

Instructor: Bruce Payne

Considers the arts in American civic life; conflicts about quality and democracy, arts education, censorship, and public funding; aims and effects of philanthropic arts support; objectives and problems of arts institutions.

Includes theater and music performances, visits to museums, seminars with artists, philanthropists, museum and foundation executives, and public officials. (Open to participants in the HLP’s Leadership and the Arts in New York program). [Areas of Knowledge: SS]

HIST 126D - AMERICAN DREAMS/AMERICAN REALITIES

(MonWed 11:40-12:55 with Friday discussion section); Social Sciences 139.

Instructor: Gerald Wilson

This course examines the role of such myths as “rags to riches,” “beacon to the world,” the “frontier” and the “foreign devil” in defining the American character and determining the hopes, fears, dreams and actions throughout American History.

Attention will be given to the surface consistency of these myths as accepted by each immigrant group versus the shifting content of the myths as they change to reflect the hopes and values of each of these groups. [Areas of Knowledge: CZ; Modes of Inquiry: CCI]

HIST 196S.06 - LEADERSHIP IN AMERICA

(TTh 4:25-5:40); Soc/Psych 128.

Instructor: Gerald Wilson

The seminar will focus on political social, business, and artistic leaders in American history and problems which have called for leadership. In addition to selected short reading, students will examine closely the following: James Mac Gregor Burns’ “Leadership”; Walter Clark’s “Ox Bow Incident”; Niccolo Machiavelli’s “The Prince”; May and R. Neustadt’s “Thinking in Time”; Robert Penn Warren’s “All the King’s Men”; Gary Wills’ “Certain Trumpets”; and David Gergen’s “Eyewitness to Power.” [Areas of Knowledge: CZ; Modes of Inquiry: EI, R]

PUPPOL 196S.39 - MAKING CHANGE IN COMMUNITIES

(M 6:00-8:30PM); Sanford 102.

Instructor: Julie Thomasson Mooney

Explores leadership approaches to influencing change around tough issues facing Southern communities such as education and economic development, with special emphases on race and poverty. Students examine the meaning of leadership as a shared activity and explore a range of leadership approaches to creating social change, including collaboration, service, advocacy, and community organizing.

A major class project allows students to analyze a current issue in a nearby community and conceive of strategies for change in that community [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Modes of Inquiry: W]

PUBPOL 182S.01 -INTERMEDIATE DOCUMENTARY FILMMAKING

(Th 3:05 PM-5:35 PM) Lyndhurst 104.

Instructor: Gary Hawkins

Intermediate to advanced filmmaking techniques. Presumes a working knowledge of Final Cut Pro, mini-DV camera, and some fieldwork experience with a camcorder. Topics include fieldwork in a variety of communities and work on pertinent social and cultural issues. Prerequisite: Documentary Studies 105S or equivalent experience and knowledge. Consent of instructor required. [Areas of Knowledge: ALP, SS] Crosslisted as: DOCST 150S, FVD 116S

PUBPOL 166 - THE INSURGENT SOUTH

(TuTh 11:40-12:55) Sanford 03.

Instructor: Robert Korstad

Social movements in the South from Reconstruction to the present. Includes Populism, Women’s Suffrage, the Interracial Movement, labor, civil rights, and post-1960s conservatism. Attention to public policy positions espoused by social movement organizations and activists. Lecture/discussion. Weekly writing assignments. [Areas of Knowledge: CZ, SS] Crosslisted as: HIST 166

PUBPOL 146 - LEADERSHIP, DEVELOPMENT AND ORGANIZATIONS

(TuTh: 4:25-5:40), Sanford 04.

Instructor: Tony Brown

Effective leadership processes in different types of organizations and situations. Focus on ethical leadership behavior. Topics range from ethics, citizenship, and the meaning of a great society to “defining moments” of individual ethical behavior in leadership situations. Course includes an important service learning project in Durham, along with reflection on the ethical leadership experience. [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Modes of Inquiry: EI]

PUBPOL 145 - LEADERSHIP, POLICY AND CHANGE

(TuTh 1:15-2:30), Sanford 224.

Instructor: Steve Schewel

Explores two critical and closely related aspects of leading social change: the role of courageous individual moral choice and the role of individuals in social movements. Investigates the pressures to compromise beliefs, conform and obey. This semester focuses on civil liberties and human rights during wartime from World War II through the Cold War, Vietnam and the Abu Ghraib prison abuses in Iraq.

Approaches include biography, fiction, journalism, historical narrative, social psychology and film. [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Modes of Inquiry: EI]

PUBPOL 144S - ENTERPRISING LEADERSHIP

(WedFri, 1:15-2:30), Sanford 150.

Instructor: Tony Brown

How leaders and their associates become social innovators in a variety of situations. Focus on enterprises that have strong social and commercial values. Social innovation theories and models, evaluation of social innovation situations, social innovator competencies, and personal values and traits. Ethics, character and citizenship are important themes.

Class includes a personal social innovator plan, campus and community leadership projects, case discussions, and a ropes course. Consent of instructor required. [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Modes of Inquiry: EI]

PUBPOL 136.01 - CIVIC PARTICIPATION AND COMMUNITY LEADERSHIP

(TuTh, 2:50-4:05), Sanford 150.

Instructor: Alma Blount

Explores ways in which value conflicts in communities affect civic and political participation, as well as policy design. Examines a series of questions about reinventing democracy at the grassroots. Challenges students to develop a framework of problem solving approaches and to consider diverse ways to exercise leadership in the face of competing interests. [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Modes of Inquiry: EI]

HISTORY 195S.15 AMERICAN DREAMS/AMERICAN REALITIES

(Tu Th 11:40 AM-12:55), Soc/Psych 128

Instructor: Gerald Wilson

This seminar will examine the role of such myths as “rags to riches,” “beacon to the world,” the “frontier” and the “foreign devil” in defining the American character and determining the hopes, fears, dreams and actions of people throughout American History.

In addition to selected short readings, students will examine closely Arthur M. Schlesinger’s “The Disuniting of America,” David Potter’s “People of Plenty,” David Halberstam’s, “The Fifties,” Johns Hellmanns, “American Myth and the Legacy of Viet Nam,” and Robert A. Rosenbloum and Gerald L. Wilson’s “The Value of Myth, Mythic Aspects of American History” (Course Pak). [Areas of Knowledge: CZ; Modes of Inquiry: R]

HISTORY 195S.06 LEADERSHIP IN AMERICAN HISTORY

(Mon Wed 4:25-5:40), Soc/Psych 128

Instructor: Gerald Wilson

The seminar will focus on political social, business, and artistic leaders in American history and problems which have called for leadership. In addition to selected short reading, students will examine closely the following: James Mac Gregor Burns’ “Leadership,” Walter Clark’s “Ox Bow Incident,” Niccolo Machiavelli’s “The Prince,” Richard Neustadt and Ernesto May’s, “Thinking in Time,” Robert Penn Warren’s “All the King’s Men,” Gary Wills’ “Certain Trumpets,” David Gergen’s “Eyewitness to Power.” [Areas of Knowledge: CZ; Modes of Inquiry: EI, R]

PPS 166A THE INSURGENT SOUTH

(Mon Wed 10:05-11:20), Sanford 03

Instructor: Robert Korstad

Social movements in the South from Reconstruction to the present. Includes Populism, Women’s Suffrage, the Interracial Movement, labor, civil rights, and post-1960s conservatism. Attention to public policy positions espoused by social movement organizations and activists. Lecture/discussion. Weekly writing assignments. [Areas of Knowledge: CZ, SS] crosslisted history.

PPS 146.01 LEADERSHIP, DEVELOPMENT, AND ORGANIZATIONS

(Tu Th 4:25-5:40), Sanford 05

Instructor: Tony Brown

Leadership, Development, and Organizations is designed to provide students with the knowledge, analytical competence, and skills needed to exercise leadership in organizations and address problems in our society. The course explores the many facets of leadership, leadership development, and the processes by which enterprising people affect change in a variety of organizational situations.

It focuses on a variety of experiential learning activities including case discussions, community leadership projects, guest speakers, and personal reflection. [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Modes of Inquiry:EI]

PPS 145.01 LEADERSHIP AND POLICY CHANGE

(Tu Th 2:50-4:05), Sanford 150

Instructor: Bruce Payne

Ethical and practical issues of social and organizational change, including conflicts about power and authority, violence, gender, race, fairness, wealth and work. How imagination, fictional and historical narratives, anger, friendship, and teaching skills can be useful in working for change. Problems of group dynamics, integrity, responsibility, and self-understanding faced by those supporting or opposing changes. [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Modes of Inquiry:EI]

PPS 144S.01 ENTERPRISING LEADERSHIP

(Wed Fri 1:15-2:30), Sanford 225

Instructor: Tony Brown

Enterprising Leadership is designed to provide students with the skills, analytical perspectives, and knowledge needed to deal effectively with social entrepreneurism as a major contemporary force addressing problem in our society. Ethics, citizenship, and public policy implications are important course themes.

The course consists primarily of a team project that identifies a credible idea, develops a compelling plan, and marshals resources necessary to implement a new social venture project in Durham or at Duke. Class activities include case discussions and speakers. Not open to seniors. Consent of instructor is required. [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Inquiries/Competencies: EI]

PPS 140S, WOMEN AS LEADERS

(Wed Fri, 1:15-2:30), Sanford 102

Instructor: Betsy Alden

Intellectual and experiential exploration of the theory and practice of leadership, with an emphasis on the special role gender plays. Topics include: authority, conflict, power, and an assessment of each student’s potential for leadership. This is a Service-Learning course, which also requires mentoring at-risk middle school girls on Monday or Tuesday afternoon from 2:30-4:30. Small group work required. [Areas of Knowledge: SS]

PPS 116D - POLICY CHOICE AS VALUE CONFLICT

Bruce Payne: (Tu Th 1:15-2:30), Sanford 03 with Friday discussion section. Bob Korstad: (Mon Wed 2:50-4:05), Sanford 03 with Friday discussion section

Instructor: Robert Korstad

Bruce Payne This class is one of the core courses in the Public Policy Studies curriculum. Focused on ethics in public life, it asks how conscience, character, and varieties of moral reasoning can help in facing corruption, deception, war, and social injustice. Readings and discussion from political theory, fiction, and history. [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Modes of Inquiry: EI]

PPS 049S.01 CIVIC PARTICIPATION/COMMUNITY LEADERSHIP

(Tu Th 2:50-4:05), Sanford 102; (Th 4:25-5:40), Sanford 102

Instructor: Alma Blount

This seminar addresses a series of questions about defining and revitalizing democracy at the grassroots in the United States. We will investigate current events at the international, national and local levels as we pose the question, “What does it mean to be an engaged citizen?”

The work of the course requires analyzing current events, developing your own point of view about complex political issues, and participating in fast-paced discussions with people who may disagree with you. Your full participation in this work will give you a sense of the challenges and rewards of public discourse and group problem-solving work. [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Modes of Inquiry: EI]

HST 196s.06 - Leadership in America

(TTH, 4:25-5:40)

Instructor: Gerald Wilson

The seminar will focus on political social, business, and artistic leaders in American history and problems which have called for leadership. In addition to selected short reading, students will examine closely the following: James Mac Gregor Burns’ “Leadership”; Walter Clark’s “Ox Bow Incident”; Niccolo Machiavelli’s “The Prince”; May and R. Neustadt’s “Thinking in Time”; Robert Penn Warren’s “All the King’s Men”; Gary Wills’ “Certain Trumpets”; and David Gergen’s “Eyewitness to Power.” [Areas of Knowledge: CZ; Modes of Inquiry: EI, R]

HST 126D - American Dreams/American Realities

(Mon Wed, 11:40-12:55; discussion section time TBA)

Instructor: Gerald Wilson

Course will examine the role of such myths as “rags to riches,” “beacon to the world,” the “frontier,” and the “foreign devil” in defining the American character and determining hopes, fears, dreams, and actions throughout American History. Attention will be given to the surface consistency of these myths as accepted by each immigrant group versus the shifting content of the myths as they change to reflect the hopes and values of each of these groups. Not open to students who have taken 97D. [Areas of Knowledge: CZ; Modes of Inquiry: CCI]

PUBPOL 270S/HST211S-History Of Poverty In US

(Mon Wed 4:25-5:40)

Instructor: Robert Korstad

A history of poverty and poverty policy in the United States from the colonial era to the present. The changing experience of poverty, efforts to analyze and measure poverty, and attempts to alleviate or eliminate it. Attention paid to the reasons for the durability of poverty in a wealthy nation and to the forces shaping the contours of anti-poverty policy. [Areas of Knowledge: CZ, SS; Inquiries/Competencies: CCI]

PUBPOL 196S.60 - Behind the Miracle: The Role of Leadership and Ethics in Making the South African Constitution

(Mon Wed 10:05-11:20)

Instructor: Halton Cheadle

Course will examine the acts of extraordinary ethical leadership that brought South Africans together during the post-apartheid transfer of power. The South African constitution making process will be considered, in particular the specific conditions, principles and mechanics for its success.

Themes include the politics of inclusion, amnesty, and consensus and pact formation. Included will be case studies of other societies undergoing transition from authoritarian rule or pursuing a constitutional resolution to ethnic or religious division. Course will also examine to what extent South Africa’s success is reproducible and to what extent it was dependent upon its particular conditions.

PUBPOL 196.34/HST 104.34 - New Perspectives on Public Policy & Civil Rights

(Mon Wed 10:05-11:20) [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Inquiries/Competencies: CCI]

Instructor: Robert Korstad

This course will look at the relationship between various public policies and what is being called “The Long Civil Rights Movement,” the period from World War II to the present. The course will investigate how movement leaders advocated for specific policy changes in areas such as education, voting, housing, health care, and job training. The course will use recent studies to evaluate the success of these policy interventions.

PUBPOL 196.30 - Border Crossing: Leadership, Value Conflicts & Public Life

(TTH, 2:50-4:05; Wed: 3:05-3:55)

Instructors: Alma Blount, Steve Schewel

This is the preparation course for students who plan to conduct community-based research projects in the summer through the Service Opportunities in Leadership Program, or another research service learning opportunity. Students will be trained in basic research methods, complete a 20-hour service project for a local community organization, and be introduced to a leadership framework for undertaking complex problem-solving work in the public arena.

The course is designed to provide students with theoretical knowledge and critical reflection skills for entering other cultures to conduct research with community organizations. The course theme this semester is religion and public life. Students will explore the history of how religion, politics and public policy issues have become intertwined in the U.S., and investigate contemporary issues that represent a spectrum of viewpoints on faith and politics in our culture. The heart of the course will be a presentation of case studies that illuminate the complexities of religious values that can become either impediments to public problem solving work, or resources for its successful completion. [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Inquiries/Competencies: R, W]

PUBPOL 196.53 - Robertson Scholars Colloquium - Leadership, Ethics, and Public Policy

(TTh, 1:15-2:30)

Instructor: Tony Brown

The central goal of the Robertson Scholars Colloquium is to educate, motivate, and support the Robertson Scholar class of 2009. The Colloquium is designed to provide students with the knowledge, analytical competence, and skills needed to exercise ethical leadership in organizations and to address important public problems in our society.

The course explores the many facets of ethical leadership and leadership development in teams and organizations and the processes by which people effect change in a variety of roles and situations. The teaching method is interactive and experiential. [Areas of Knowledge: CZ, SS; Inquiries/Competencies: EI]

PUBPOL 176S- American Communities: A Documentary Approach

(Wed, 7:15-9:45)

Instructor: Alex Harris

A seminar in the theory and practice of documentary photography. Each student will choose a community outside the university and complete a semester-long documentary photographic study of that community. The class will also examine and discuss the documentary tradition and classic documentary books while at the same time emphasizing the photographs produced by the students. [Areas of Knowledge: AL, SS; Inquiries/Competencies: IAA]

HISTORY 195S.06 - LEADERSHIP IN AMERICAN HISTORY

(Tu Th 4:25-5:40), Soc/Psych 128

Instructor: Gerald Wilson

The seminar will focus on political social, business, and artistic leaders in American history and problems which have called for leadership. In addition to selected short reading, students will examine closely the following: James Mac Gregor Burns’ “Leadership,” Walter Clark’s “Ox Bow Incident,” Niccolo Machiavelli’s “The Prince,” Richard Neustadt and Ernesto May’s, “Thinking in Time,” Robert Penn Warren’s “All the King’s Men,” Gary Wills’ “Certain Trumpets,” David Gergen’s “Eyewitness to Power,” and William Chafe’s “Private Lives/Public Consequences.” [Areas of Knowledge: CZ; Modes of Inquiry: EI, R] PERMISSION REQUIRED

HISTORY 126D - AMERICAN DREAMS/AMERICAN REALITIES

(Mon Wed, 11:55-12:24), Soc Sci 136, Friday discussion section.

Instructor: Gerald Wilson

The role of such myths as “rags to riches,” “beacon to the world,” the “frontier,” and the “foreign devil” in defining the American character and determining hopes, fears, dreams, and actions throughout American History. Attention given to the surface consistency of these myths as accepted by each immigrant group versus the shifting content of the myths as they change to reflect the hopes and values of each of these groups. Not open to students who have taken 97D. [Areas of Knowledge: CCI, CZ]

PPS 177S - ADVANCED DOCUMENTARY PHOTOGRAPHY

(Mon 7:15-9:45PM), Smith WRHS 228

Instructor: Alex Harris

An advanced course for students who have taken Public Policy Studies 176S or have had substantial experience in documentary fieldwork. Students complete an individual photographic project and study important works within the documentary tradition. Prerequisite: Visual Arts 118S, Public Policy Studies 176S, or consent of instructor. [Areas of Knowledge: ALP, SS] Crosslisted DOCST 177S, ARTVIS 119S

PPS 166 - THE INSURGENT SOUTH

(Mon Wed 10:05-11:20), Sanford 03

Instructor: Robert Korstad

Social movements in the South from Reconstruction to the present. Includes Populism, Women’s Suffrage, the Interracial Movement, labor, civil rights, and post-1960s conservatism. Attention to public policy positions espoused by social movement organizations and activists. Lecture/discussion. Weekly writing assignments. [Areas of Knowledge: CZ, SS] Crosslisted History 166A

PPS 146 - LEADERSHIP, DEVELOPMENT, AND ORGANIZATIONS

(Tu Th 4:25-5:40), Sanford 05

Instructor: Tony Brown

Course provides students with the knowledge, analytical competence, and skills needed to exercise leadership in organizations and address problems in our society. The course explores the many facets of leadership, leadership development, and the processes by which enterprising people affect change in a variety of organizational situations. It focuses on a variety of experiential learning activities including case discussions, community leadership projects, guest speakers, and personal reflection. [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Inquiries/Competencies: EI]

PPS 144S - ENTERPRISING LEADERSHIP

(Wed Fri 10:05-11:20), Rubenstein 151

Instructor: Tony Brown

Designed to provide students with the skills, analytical perspectives, and knowledge needed to deal effectively with social entrepreneurism as a major contemporary force addressing problems in our society. Ethics, citizenship, and public policy implications are important course themes.

The course consists primarily of a team project that identifies a credible idea, develops a compelling plan, and marshals resources necessary to implement a new social venture project in Durham or at Duke. Class activities include case discussions and speakers. Not open to seniors. [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Inquiries/Competencies: EI] PERMISSION REQUIRED

PPS 140S - WOMEN AS LEADERS

(Wed Fri, 1:15-2:30), Sanford 102

Instructor: Betsy Alden

Intellectual and experiential exploration of the theory and practice of leadership, with an emphasis on the special role gender plays. Topics include: authority, conflict, power, and an assessment of each student’s potential for leadership. This is a Service-Learning course, which also requires mentoring at-risk middle school girls on Monday or Tuesday afternoons from 2-5. Small group work required. [Areas of Knowledge: SS] PERMISSION REQUIRED

PPS 137 - ADAPTIVE LEADERSHIP

(Wed 6:00-8:30), Sanford 150

Instructor: Alma Blount

Capstone seminar for students completing community-based research (CBR) projects through the Service Opportunities in Leadership program. Involves critical reflection on summer projects, exploration of leadership, politics, and policy design concepts. With students’ experiences, questions, and insights as a starting point, this course explores how lives of commitment to the common good are formed and sustained. [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Inquiries/Competencies: EI, W, R] PERMISSION REQUIRED

PPS 116D.03 - POLICY CHOICE AS VALUE CONFLICT

(Mon Wed, 2:50-4:05), Sanford 03, Friday discussion section or (Tu Th, 1:15-2:30), Sanford 03, Friday discussion section.

Instructor: Jeff Holzgrefe

Core course for PPS undergraduate major. This course examines the nature and persuasiveness of many different arguments about ethics and public policy. The aims of this course are: (1) to examine the underpinnings and implications of basic moral concepts like liberty, justice, community, rights, virtue, and identity; (2) to apply such concepts to policy conflicts; and (3) to help students develop more sophisticated understandings and justifications of various moral commitments.

The course provides regular exercises designed to give students the opportunity to reflect upon important issues in ethics and public policy through reading, writing, and discussion. [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Inquiries/Competencies: EI]

PPS 116D.01 - POLICY CHOICE AS VALUE CONFLICT

Instructor: Robert Korstad

PPS 301: Political Analysis in Public Policy

Instructor: Jay Hamilton

Topic: Financial Education in the Latino Community
Community Partner: Latino Community Credit Union
RSL Students: 15

History 196S.07 - American Dreams/American Realities

Instructor: Gerald Wilson

This seminar will examine the role of such myths as “rags to riches,” “beacon to the world,” the “frontier” and the “foreign devil” in defining the American character and determining the hopes, fears, dreams and actions of people throughout American History.

In addition to selected short readings, students will examine closely Arthur M. Schlesinger’s “The Disuniting of America,” David Potter’s “People of Plenty,” David Halberstam’s, “The Fifties,” Johns Hellmanns, “American Myth and the Legacy of Viet Nam,” and Robert A. Rosenbloum and Gerald L. Wilson’s “The Value of Myth, Mythic Aspects of American History” (Course Pak). [Areas of Knowledge: CZ; Modes of Inquiry: R]

History 196S.06 - Leadership in American History

Instructor: Gerald Wilson

The seminar will focus on political social, business, and artistic leaders in American history and problems which have called for leadership. In addition to selected short reading, students will examine closely the following: James MacGregor Burns’ “Leadership”; Walter Clark’s “Ox Bow Incident”; Niccolo Machiavelli’s “The Prince”; May and R. Neustadt’s “Thinking in Time”; Robert Penn Warren’s “All the King’s Men”; Gary Wills’ “Certain Trumpets”; and David Gergen’s “Eyewitness to Power.” [Areas of Knowledge: CZ; Modes of Inquiry: EI, R]

PUBPOL 264S.34 - Historical Perspectives on Public Policy

(MW 4:25-5:40pm)

Instructor: Robert Korstad

This course will explore the ways that history and historical thinking can be of assistance to public policy makers. All issues have a history, and that history will shape policy whether we understand it or not. This course will add focused historical understanding to the conceptual tools already deployed in public policy and raise important methodological questions about how and why history matters to the work we do. In what ways can history provide evidence for social science generalizations and policy considerations?

To what extent can historical analysis of single case studies provide useful ‘lessons learned’ for policy makers? In what ways can historical interpretation improve predictions about the behaviors of social groups and nations and thereby serve to inform the choices that policy makers possess? How do narrative techniques and story-telling strategies shape the crafting and implementation of public policy in the past and present? To what extent are counterfactuals, when used with discipline and imagination, effective tools for conducting social science research and making public policy? [Areas of Knowledge: CZ, SS]

PUBPOL 196.53 - Robertson Scholars Colloquium - Leadership, Ethics, and Public Policy

(TTH 4:25-5:40pm)

Instructor: Tony Brown

The central goal of the Robertson Scholars Colloquium is to educate, motivate, and support the Robertson Scholar class of 2010 to launch an extraordinary college experience for themselves. The Colloquium is designed to provide Robertson Scholars with enhanced knowledge, analytical competence, and skills important to the exercise of ethical leadership.

The course explores many facets of ethical leadership, leadership development, and the processes by which people affect change in teams, organizations, and communities. The teaching method is highly experiential and interactive. [Areas of Knowledge: CZ, SS; Inquiries/Competencies: EI]

PUBPOL 196.34/HST 104.34 - New Perspectives on Public Policy & Civil Rights

(MW 10:05-11:20am)

Instructor: Robert Korstad

This course will look at the relationship between various public policies and what is being called “The Long Civil Rights Movement,” the period from World War II to the present. The course will investigate how movement leaders advocated for specific policy changes in areas such as education, voting, housing, health care, and job training. The course will use recent studies to evaluate the success of these policy interventions. [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Inquiries/Competencies: CCI]

PUBPOL 196.30 - Border Crossing: Leadership, Value Conflicts & Public Life

(TTH 2:50-4:05pm, W 3:05-3:55pm)

Instructors: Alma Blount, Steve Schewel

This is the preparation course for students who plan to conduct community-based research projects in the summer through the Service Opportunities in Leadership Program, or another research service learning opportunity. Students will be trained in basic research methods, complete a 20-hour service project for a local community organization, and be introduced to a leadership framework for undertaking complex problem-solving work in the public arena.

The course is designed to provide students with theoretical knowledge and critical reflection skills for entering other cultures to conduct research with community organizations. The course theme this semester is religion and public life. Students will explore the history of how religion, politics and public policy issues have become intertwined in the U.S., and investigate contemporary issues that represent a spectrum of viewpoints on faith and politics in our culture. The heart of the course will be a presentation of case studies that illuminate the complexities of religious values that can become either impediments to public problem solving work, or resources for its successful completion. [Areas of Knowledge: SS, EI; Inquiries/Competencies: R, W]

PPS 146 - Leadership, Development, and Organizations

(TTH 1:15-2:30pm)

Instructor: Tony Brown

Course provides students with the knowledge, analytical competence, and skills needed to exercise leadership in organizations and address problems in our society. The course explores the many facets of leadership, leadership development, and the processes by which enterprising people affect change in a variety of organizational situations. It focuses on a variety of experiential learning activities including case discussions, community leadership projects, guest speakers, and personal reflection. [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Inquiries/Competencies: EI]

PPS 301: Political Analysis in Public Policy

Instructor: Kristin A. Goss

Topic: The Euthanasia of Healthy Animals in the Triangle Area
Community Partners: Animal Protection Society of Durham, Animal Protection Society of Orange County (Chapel Hill), Safe Haven for Cats
RSL Students: 14

History 195S.07 - AMERICAN DREAMS/AMERICAN REALITIES

( MW 11:40-12:55), Soc/Psych 128

Instructor: Gerald Wilson

This seminar will examine the role of such myths as “rags to riches,” “beacon to the world,” the “frontier” and the “foreign devil” in defining the American character and determining the hopes, fears, dreams and actions of people throughout American History.

In addition to selected short readings, students will examine closely Arthur M. Schlesinger’s “The Disuniting of America,” David Potter’s “People of Plenty,” David Halberstam’s, “The Fifties,” John Hellmanns’, “American Myth and the Legacy of Viet Nam,” and Robert A. Rosenbloum and Gerald L. Wilson’s “The Value of Myth, Mythic Aspects of American History” (Course Pak). [Areas of Knowledge: CZ; Inquiries/Competencies: R]

History 195S.06 - LEADERSHIP IN AMERICAN HISTORY

( Tu Th 4:25-5:40), Soc/Psych 128

Instructor: Gerald Wilson

The seminar will focus on political, social, business, and artistic leaders in American history and problems which have called for leadership. In addition to selected short reading, students will examine closely the following: James MacGregor Burns’ “Leadership”; Walter Clark’s “Ox Bow Incident”; Niccolo Machiavelli’s “The Prince”; May and R. Neustadt’s “Thinking in Time”; Robert Penn Warren’s “All the King’s Men”; Gary Wills’ “Certain Trumpets”; and David Gergen’s “Eyewitness to Power.” [Areas of Knowledge: CZ; Inquiries/Competencies: EI, R]

PPS 264S.02 - LEADERSHIP AND PUBLIC VALUES

(Tu 2:50-5:20), Sanford 150

Instructor: James A. Joseph

This course will be an examination of ethics in public life with particular attention to public values that transform communities and empower leaders. Using case studies from actual experiences in government, business and civil society, each student will be asked to develop a framework/set of principles for making public policy decisions. [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Inquiries/Competencies: EI]

PPS 195S.20 - PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICES OF HIGH-IMPACT LEADERSHIP The Application of Military Leadership to the Civilian World of Work

(Tu 10:05 AM-12:35 PM), Sanford 150.

Instructors: Joe LeBoeuf, Mark Tribus

Leadership is one of the most compelling topics of our time, and might well be one of the most important attributes for effectiveness in all levels of human endeavor. The success of one of most admired and respected institutions in our country, the military, is founded on the understanding and effective application of leadership, and the development of leaders. Two legends in the field of management, Peter Drucker and Jack Welch, suggested that if you really want to understand leadership, look to the United States Military.

This course is designed to inspire an interest in the theory and practice of military leadership and to explore how these principles and practices might be applied to the civilian world of work. The course will explore topics such as values-based behavior [courage, trust, ethics], the professional code and warrior ethic, power and authority, individual motivation, cohesion, team and group effectiveness, crisis leadership and leadership in extremis [particularly the lessons of combat]. The format of the course will be an active-learning, seminar-based educational experience. [Areas of Knowledge: SS]

PPS 144S - ENTERPRISING LEADERSHIP

(Th 2:50 - 5:20), Rubenstein 149

Instructor: Christopher Gergen

Become an entrepreneur. This seminar class takes a hands-on approach to teaching how to take a big idea and put it into action through a well designed business plan. Over the 14-weeks, you will create a social venture with a small team, participate in real-world case discussions, and develop an individualized entrepreneurial life plan.

We will bring in accomplished entrepreneurs to share their stories and explore how to apply entrepreneurial principles to life decisions. The goal of the course is to help students develop the leadership skills necessary to create high-impact social enterprises in the future and live an entrepreneurial life. [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Inquiries/Competencies: EI] PERMISSION REQUIRED

PPS 140S - WOMEN AS LEADERS

(WF, 10:05-11:20), Sanford 150

Instructor: Rachel Seidman

This course will teach students to better understand the challenges and opportunities facing women, including themselves, in their quest to practice leadership in public life. Students will understand the historical roots of our conceptions of leadership and the ways American women have worked with, around and on those ideas over the last two centuries.

They will analyze the current-day debates over women and leadership in the press and academic literature, and the relationship between theory and practice. Students will gain confidence in their own ability to create leadership roles for themselves over time, and will begin to shape goals that are creative, challenging and optimistic, while founded on a realistic understanding of the complexities involved in women’s lives and in practicing the art of leadership in public life. [Areas of Knowledge: SS]

PPS 137 - ADAPTIVE LEADERSHIP

(W 6:00-8:30), Sanford 150

Instructor: Alma Blount

Capstone seminar for students completing community-based research (CBR) projects through the Service Opportunities in Leadership program. Involves critical reflection on summer projects, exploration of leadership, politics, and policy design concepts. With students’ experiences, questions, and insights as a starting point, this course explores how lives of commitment to the common good are formed and sustained. [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Inquiries/Competencies: EI, W, R] PERMISSION REQUIRED

PPS 081FCS.02 - HUMANITARIAN CHALLENGES AT HOME

(MW 10:05-11:20), Sanford 102

Instructor: Robert Korstad

This course will investigate human rights issues within the United States . Among the topics the course will cover are: high rates of incarceration of African American males; violations of the civil rights of gays and lesbians, wealth and income disparities; the political and social status of recent immigrants; and questions about the treatment of war on terrorism detainees.

Students will read books and articles in preparation for class discussion; complete short written assignments throughout the semester; keep an online scrapbooks of assorted media dealing with human rights issues in the United States ; and participate in online discussions on BLACKBOARD. [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Inquiries/Competencies: EI] PERMISSION REQUIRED

PPS 301: Political Analysis in Public Policy

Instructor: Ken Rogerson

Topic: Differing Perspectives on a Proposed Land Transfer to Two Social Service Providers
Community Partners: Genesis Home, Housing for New Hope, The Cleveland-Holloway Neighborhood Association
RSL Students: 15

HISTORY 196S.07 - AMERICAN DREAMS/AMERICAN REALITIES

( M W 11:40-12:55), Soc/Psych 128

Instructor: Gerald Wilson

This seminar will examine the role of such myths as “rags to riches,” “beacon to the world,” the “frontier” and the “foreign devil” in defining the American character and determining the hopes, fears, dreams and actions of people throughout American history.

In addition to selected short readings, students will examine closely Arthur M. Schlesinger’s The Disuniting of America ; David Potter’s People of Plenty ; David Halberstam’s, The Fifties ; John Hellmanns’ American Myth and the Legacy of Viet Nam ; and Robert A. Rosenbloum and Gerald L. Wilson’s The Value of Myth, Mythic Aspects of American History (Course Pack). [Areas of Knowledge: CZ; Inquiries/Competencies: R] PERMISSION REQUIRED

HISTORY 196S.06 -LEADERSHIP IN AMERICAN HISTORY

( Tu Th 4:25-5:40), Soc/Psych 128

Instructor: Gerald Wilson

The seminar will focus on political, social, business, and artistic leaders in American history and problems that have called for leadership. In addition to selected short readings, students will examine closely the following: James MacGregor Burns’ Leadership ; Walter Clark’s Ox Bow Incident ; Niccolo Machiavelli’s The Prince ; May and R. Neustadt’s Thinking in Time ; Robert Penn Warren’s All the King’s Men ; Gary Wills’ Certain Trumpets ; and David Gergen’s Eyewitness to Power . [Areas of Knowledge: CZ; Inquiries/Competencies: EI, R] PERMISSION REQUIRED

PPS 264.34 - HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVES ON PUBLIC POLICY

(Tu Th 11:40-12:55, Friday discussion TBA), Rubenstein 153.

Instructor: Robert Korstad

This course explores the ways that history and historical thinking can be of assistance to public policy makers. Serving as a gateway course for students participating in a summer research project in South Africa as part of the Sanford Institute’s new Program for the Study of History, Public Policy, and Social Change, the course raises important methodological questions about how and why history matters in the work we do.

To what extent can historical analysis improve predictions about the behaviors of social groups and nations and thereby serve to inform the choices that policy makers possess? How do narrative techniques and story-telling strategies shape the crafting and implementation of public policy in the past and present? To what extent are counterfactuals, when used with discipline and imagination, effective tools for conducting social science research and making public policy? [Areas of Knowledge: CZ, SS]

PPS 196.30 - BORDER CROSSING: LEADERSHIP, VALUE CONFLICTS & PUBLIC LIFE

(Tu Th 10:05-11:20, W 11:55-12:45 discussion), Sanford 03.

Instructor: Steve Schewel

This is the preparation course for students who plan to conduct community-based research projects in the summer through the Service Opportunities in Leadership Program, or another research service-learning opportunity. Students will be trained in basic research methods, complete a 20-hour service project for a local community organization, and be introduced to a leadership framework for undertaking complex problem solving work in the public arena.

The course is designed to provide students with theoretical knowledge and critical reflection skills for entering other cultures to conduct research with community organizations. It is inevitable that students will encounter value conflicts when they enter a new culture. Some of the most important work of this course will be our mutual reflection on the meaning, uses and misuses of these conflicts. We will approach this work through our theme this semester: religion and public life. We will explore the history of how religion, politics and public policy issues have become intertwined in the U.S. and abroad and investigate contemporary issues that represent a spectrum of viewpoints on faith and politics in our culture. The heart of the course will be a presentation of case studies that illuminate the complexities of religious values that can become either impediments to public problem-solving work or resources for its successful completion. [Areas of Knowledge: SS, EI; Inquiries/Competencies: R, W] PERMISSION REQUIRED

PPS 196.03 - LEADING IN A NEW WORLD

(M 3:05-5:35), Sanford 04.

Instructor: Anthony Zinni

In General Zinni’s last book, The Battle for Peace, he described how the world has significantly changed beginning with the collapse of the Soviet Union near the end of the last century. That collapse seemed to unleash a series of events and unprecedented phenomena that led to the reordering and altering of almost every aspect of our global society.

Globalization, the rise of non-state entities, mass migrations, access to new technologies, the arrival of the Information Age, the emergence of new powers in the world, and many other world altering factors have caused a confluence of major changes that have reshaped our world and the way we must operate in it. This means that it has become necessary to develop fresh approaches to ensuring our security, governing ourselves, economically prospering, dealing with our environment, and adapting to social change. There is a new leader emerging who has combined some new skills with some selected tried and true skills into what seems to be the right blend required to succeed today. In this course, students will examine the trends that have reshaped our world and the ways in which visionary leaders and organizations have effectively responded to such change. [Areas of Knowledge: SS] PERMISSION REQUIRED

PPS 168S.01 - DOCUMENTARY ENGAGEMENT

(M 1:15-3:45), location TBA.

Instructor: Alex Harris

Documentary photography as a tool for social engagement in preparation for intensive summer field-based projects. Students study documentary photographers, pursue a local documentary project, while planning their own summer documentary projects through which they will address societal issues locally, nationally, or abroad.

Students learn and refine valuable technical skills such as Photoshop and web-based methods in order to complete a preliminary documentary in the Triangle area by the end of the semester. Service-learning course. Consent of instructor required. See course synopsis handbook and/or contact alex.harris@duke.edu

PPS 116D.01 - POLICY CHOICE AS VALUE CONFLICT

(Tu Th 2:50 - 4:05), Sanford 03.

Instructor: Robert Korstad

This course, which will also be a research service-learning gateway course, is one of the core courses in the Public Policy Studies curriculum. Focused on ethics in public life, the course asks students to investigate how conscience, character, and varieties of moral reasoning can help us in addressing corruption, deception, war, and social injustice. Readings and discussions are drawn from political theory, fiction, and history. [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Inquiries/Competencies: EI]

PPS 49S.01 - CIVIC PARTICIPATION AND COMMUNITY LEADERSHIP

(Tu Th 2:50 - 4:05), Sanford 102.

Instructor: Alma Blount

This seminar addresses a series of questions about defining and revitalizing democracy at the grassroots in the United States . We will investigate current events at the international, national and local levels as we pose the question, “What does it mean to be an engaged citizen?”

The work of the course requires analyzing current events, developing your own point of view about complex political issues, and participating in fast-paced discussions with people who may disagree with you. Your full participation in this work will give you a sense of the challenges and rewards of public discourse and group problem-solving work. [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Inquiries/Competencies: EI] PERMISSION REQUIRED

PPS 302: Policy Choice as Value Conflict

Instructor: Robert Korstad

Topic: Exploring Civic Engagement on a Grassroots Level
Community Partners: The Old West Durham Neighborhood Association (OWDNA), Uplift East Durham, The Cleveland Holloway Neighborhood Association
RSL Students: 15

History 195S.11 - American Dreams/American Realities

Instructor: Gerald Wilson

This seminar will examine the role of such myths as “rags to riches,” “beacon to the world,” the “frontier” and the “foreign devil” in defining the American character and determining the hopes, fears, dreams and actions of people throughout American History.

In addition to selected short readings, students will examine closely Arthur M. Schlesinger’s “The Disuniting of America,” David Potter’s “People of Plenty,” David Halberstam’s, “The Fifties,” John Hellmanns’, “American Myth and the Legacy of Viet Nam,” and Robert A. Rosenbloum and Gerald L. Wilson’s “The Value of Myth, Mythic Aspects of American History” (Course Pak). [Areas of Knowledge: CZ; Inquiries/Competencies: R]

History 195S.02 - Leadership in American History

Instructor: Gerald Wilson

The seminar will focus on political, social, business, and artistic leaders in American history and problems which have called for leadership. In addition to selected short reading, students will examine closely the following: James MacGregor Burns’ “Leadership”; Walter Clark’s “Ox Bow Incident”; Niccolo Machiavelli’s “The Prince”; May and R. Neustadt’s “Thinking in Time”; Robert Penn Warren’s “All the King’s Men”; Gary Wills’ “Certain Trumpets”; and David Gergen’s “Eyewitness to Power.” [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Inquiries/Competencies: EI, R]

PPS 264S.02 - Leadership and Public Values

Instructor: James A. Joseph

This course will be an examination of ethics in public life with particular attention to public values that transform communities and empower leaders. Using case studies from actual experiences in government, business and civil society, each student will be asked to develop a framework/set of principles for making public policy decisions. [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Inquiries/Competencies: EI]

PPS 195.20 - Principals and Practices of High Impact Leadership

Instructors: Joe LeBoeuf, Mark Tribus

Leadership is one of the most compelling topics of our time, and might well be one of the most important attributes for effectiveness in all levels of human endeavor. The success of one of most admired and respected institutions in our country, the military, is founded on the understanding and effective application of leadership, and the development of leaders. Two legends in the field of management, Peter Drucker and Jack Welch, suggested that if you really want to understand leadership, look to the United States Military.

This course is designed to inspire an interest in the theory and practice of military leadership and to explore how these principles and practices might be applied to the civilian world of work. The course will explore topics such as values-based behavior [courage, trust, ethics], the professional code and warrior ethic, power and authority, individual motivation, cohesion, team and group effectiveness, crisis leadership and leadership in extremis [particularly the lessons of combat]. The format of the course will be an active-learning, small group, workshop-based educational experience that will leverage an array of guest speakers and presenters from the civilian and military world of leadership. [Areas of Knowledge: SS] APPROVED FOR MMS ELECTIVE

PPS 195S.01 - Leading Non Profit Organizations

Instructor: Debby Warren

This seminar will introduce students to the concept and practice of leadership within the non-profit sector. Beginning with an overview of this enormously diverse “third sector” that is the lynchpin of civil society, we will examine what it means to lead as an executive and as a trustee (member of the board of directors). What skills and knowledge do executive and board leaders need? How do these roles vary with the challenges and opportunities facing a non-profit organization in its various stages of development?

How do cultural and contextual factors affect the notion of a strong leader in a non-profit context? Is leadership in this sector different from leadership in the corporate sector? Drawing from the best literature on leadership and the non-profit sector, we will also draw upon the incredibly rich array of non-profits in the Triangle. In pairs, students will attach themselves to a locally-based non-profit organization, observing its executive and trustee leadership and using the class to compare and contrast diverse examples. [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Inquiries/Competencies: EI ] APPROVED FOR MMS ELECTIVE

PPS 184S - The Photographic Essay

Instructor: Alex Harris

This seminar will examine the ways in which particular photographers have created photographic essays that communicate to a wide audience. Students will study the classic and contemporary masters of this form while creating their own photographic essays. Students will learn to choose, sequence, and pace images according to the format of their final presentation (book, magazine, exhibition, and web-based).

Three assigned projects to be completed by students during the semester as well as one final project combining images from these three essays. [Area of Knowledge: Arts, Literature, and Performance] PERMISSION REQUIRED.

PPS 146 - Leadership, Development, and Organizations

Instructor: Stephanie Helms

This course aims to provide active student leaders with the knowledge, analytical competence, and skills needed to exercise ethical and effective leadership in student groups and campus organizations. Class sessions will explore issues that are critical to leaders and organizations on campus. Potential topics include organization theory, culture and diversity, followership, organizational change; strategy and planning; conflict resolution, decision-making and judgment, leader development and leadership succession, internal and external relations, and assessment and accountability.

The course is designed to help students complete a substantial campus organization consulting project. The projects’ objectives are: (1) to experience team interpersonal dynamics and leadership challenges under real life conditions; (2) to reflect upon and learn from the experience; (3) to produce tangible products and concrete recommendations that add value to student groups and campus organizations; and (4) to learn more about the unique context of the university community. Students serving in leadership roles on campus are encouraged to enroll. [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Modes of Inquiry: EI] Permission Required MMS CORE COURSE

PPS 144S - Social Enterprise Development (formerly Enterprising Leadership)

Instructor: Christopher Gergen

Become an entrepreneur. This seminar class takes a hands-on approach to teaching how to take a big idea and put it into action through a well designed business plan. Over the 14-weeks, you will create a social venture with a small team, participate in real-world case discussions, and develop an individualized entrepreneurial life plan. We will bring in accomplished entrepreneurs to share their stories and explore how to apply entrepreneurial principles to life decisions.

The goal of the course is to help students develop the leadership skills necessary to create high-impact social enterprises in the future and live an entrepreneurial life. [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Inquiries/Competencies: EI] PERMISSION REQUIRED

PPS 140S - Women as Leaders

Instructor: Rachel Seidman

This course will teach students to better understand the challenges and opportunities facing women, including themselves, in their quest to practice leadership in public life. Students will understand the historical roots of our conceptions of leadership and the ways American women have worked with, around and on those ideas over the last two centuries.

They will analyze the current-day debates over women and leadership in the press and academic literature, and the relationship between theory and practice. Students will gain confidence in their own ability to create leadership roles for themselves over time, and will begin to shape goals that are creative, challenging and optimistic, while founded on a realistic understanding of the complexities involved in women’s lives and in practicing the art of leadership in public life. [Areas of Knowledge: SS]

PPS 137 - Adaptive Leadership

Instructor: Alma Blount

Capstone seminar for students completing community-based research (CBR) projects through the Service Opportunities in Leadership program. Involves critical reflection on summer projects, exploration of leadership, politics, and policy design concepts. With students’ experiences, questions, and insights as a starting point, this course explores how lives of commitment to the common good are formed and sustained. [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Inquiries/Competencies: EI, W, R] PERMISSION REQUIRED

PPS 134D- The Politics of Civic Engagement

Instructor: Robert Korstad

This course explores ethical issues related to civic engagement by college students, their reasons for participating, the goals of the university in sponsoring their summer experiences, and the impact they had on the people and organizations they worked with. Students will read books and articles from different political perspectives on the value and appropriateness of civic engagement. Required discussion sections will allow students to share the challenges of their own engagement. [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Inquiries/Competencies: CCI, EI ]

PPS 301: Political Analysis in Public Policy

Instructor: Ken Rogerson

Topic: Securing our Food
Community Partners: Meals on Wheels of Durham, Food Bank of Central and Eastern North Carolina- Durham Branch, Society of St. Andrew
RSL Students: 18

PPS 242: Children in Contemporary Society

Instructor: Clara Muschkin

Topic: Education in Action
Community Partners: YO: Durham (Year of Opportunity for Durham Teens), Sherwood Githens Middle School Encore! Program.
RSL Students: 10

History 196S.07 - AMERICAN DREAMS/AMERICAN REALITIES

Mon/Wed 11:40am - 12:55pm, Soc Psy 128

Instructor: Gerald Wilson

This seminar will examine the role of such myths as “rags to riches,” “beacon to the world,” the “frontier” and the “foreign devil” in defining the American character and determining the hopes, fears, dreams and actions of people throughout American History.

In addition to selected short readings, students will examine closely Arthur M. Schlesinger’s “The Disuniting of America,” David Potter’s “People of Plenty,” David Halberstam’s, “The Fifties,” John Hellmanns’, “American Myth and the Legacy of Viet Nam,” and Robert A. Rosenbloum and Gerald L. Wilson’s “The Value of Myth, Mythic Aspects of American History” (Course Pak). (M W 11:40 - 12:55), Soc Psy 128. [Areas of Knowledge: CZ; Inquiries/Competencies: R] PERMISSION REQUIRED

History 196S.06 - LEADERSHIP IN AMERICAN HISTORY

Tues/Thurs 4:25 - 5:40pm, Soc Psy 128

Instructor: Gerald Wilson

The seminar will focus on political, social, business, and artistic leaders in American history and problems which have called for leadership. In addition to selected short reading, students will examine closely the following: James MacGregor Burns’ “Leadership”; Walter Clark’s “Ox Bow Incident”; Niccolo Machiavelli’s “The Prince”; May and R. Neustadt’s “Thinking in Time”; Robert Penn Warren’s “All the King’s Men”; Gary Wills’ “Certain Trumpets”; and David Gergen’s “Eyewitness to Power.” (Tu Th 4:25- 5:40), Soc Psy 128. [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Inquiries/Competencies: EI, R] PERMISSION REQUIRED

PPS 264.34 - HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVES ON PUBLIC POLICY

Tues/Thurs 11:40am - 12:55pm, RH 153; Fri 1:30 - 2:20pm, RH 153

Instructor: Robert Korstad

This course explores the ways that history and historical thinking can be of assistance to public policy makers. Serving as a gateway course for students participating in a summer research project in South Africa as part of the Sanford Institute’s new Program for the Study of History, Public Policy, and Social Change, the course raises important methodological questions about how and why history matters in the work we do. To what extent can historical analysis improve predictions about the behaviors of social groups and nations and thereby serve to inform the choices that policy makers possess?

How do narrative techniques and story-telling strategies shape the crafting and implementation of public policy in the past and present? To what extent are counterfactuals, when used with discipline and imagination, effective tools for conducting social science research and making public policy? (Tu Th/F 11:40 - 12:55), Rubenstein 153. [Areas of Knowledge: CZ, SS]

PPS 196S.39 - STUDENTS AS PUBLIC LEADERS

Wed/Fri 1:15 - 2:30pm, Sanford 150

Instructor: David Gastwirth

Students as Public Leaders will provide emerging and aspiring student leaders with a forum to consider the leadership challenges and opportunities unique to college students and explore what it means to develop “a public self.” The course will examine generational trends and significant events in the history of student leadership (e.g. Berkeley Free Speech Movement) and contemporary student leadership approaches and contexts (e.g. organizational, entrepreneurial, social change, and political). During the course, students will deepen their understanding of the risks, rewards, and responsibilities of public leadership and the methods by which students can exercise leadership at all levels of groups and organizations.

Through an interactive instructional approach - including guest speakers, films, and case studies - students will develop an understanding of what it means to exercise leadership in public contexts. (W F 1:15- 2:30), Sanford 150. [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Inquiries/Competencies: EI] PERMISSION REQUIRED

PPS 194 - ENTREPRENEURIAL LEADERSHIP & SOCIAL INNOVATION

Thursday 2:50 - 5:20pm, TBA

Instructors: Christopher Gergen, TBA

Gateway course for the Entrepreneurial Leadership Initiative (ELI). Introduces students to the important frameworks of entrepreneurship, social innovation, and social enterprise development. Examines the dynamic relationship between social entrepreneurship and the public good through case studies, individual reflection, group projects, and experiential learning. Explores the challenges and triumphs of social entrepreneurship in areas of public concern such as education, community welfare, international development, and healthcare.

Students will also have a chance to reflect on their own leadership path by developing a personalized entrepreneurial life plan. Following the class, students will have an opportunity to develop their entrepreneurial ideas through a summer immersion experience in Durham and ELI’s fall capstone course, Social Enterprise Development. Successful enterprises are eligible for seed financing and incubation through the Duke Hatchery. (Tu Th 10:05- 11:20), Rubenstein 153. [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Inquiries/Competencies: EI] ***APPROVED AS MMS ELECTIVE***

PPS 135- BORDER CROSSING: LEADERSHIP, VALUE CONFLICTS & PUBLIC LIFE

Tues/Thurs 10:05 - 11:20am RH 149; Wed 11:55am - 12:45pm, TBA

Instructor: Alma Blount

Preparation course for students who plan to conduct community-based research projects in the summer through Service Opportunities in Leadership, or another research service learning opportunity. Through case studies of religious and political groups in U.S., Europe, and Middle East with conflicting views about the role of religious faith in public life, explores leadership as the art of working productively with difficult value conflicts in groups, institutions, and social systems.

Includes training in basic research methods and ethics of human subjects research, completion of a 20-hour service project for a community organization, and exploration of a leadership framework for undertaking complex problem-solving work in the public arena. (Tu Th/W 10:05 - 11:20), Rubenstein 149. [Areas of Knowledge: SS, EI; Inquiries/Competencies: R, W] PERMISSION REQUIRED

PPS 116D - POLICY CHOICE AS VALUE CONFLICT

Tues/Thurs 2:50-4:05pm, Sanford 03

Instructor: Robert Korstad

This course, which will also be a research service-learning gateway course, examines the ethical and moral complexities of public policy formation and implementation in the past and present. The aims of this course are 1.) To analyze and examine the varied moral foundations of public policy formation; 2.) To sharpen students’ capacity for ethical reasoning; and 3.) To locate contemporary policy debates within the broader historical contexts that have defined the moral and ethical dilemmas that policy makers and social actors currently face.

In addition to familiarizing students with the ideas of a number of political and social theorists, the course will also examine a variety of rich case studies from U.S. history that shed light on contemporary policy dilemmas. The course provides ample opportunities for reflecting upon the important but often neglected connections between ethics, history, and public policy formation and implementation. (Tu Th 2:50 - 4:05), Sanford 03. [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Inquiries/Competencies: EI]

PPS 302: Policy Choice as Value Conflict

Instructor: Robert Korstad

Topic: Empowering Local Women
Community Partners: North Carolina Coalition Against Domestic Violence, Orange County Rape Crisis Center (Chapel Hill), The Women's Center of Durham
RSL Students: 13

History 195S.07- American Dreams/American Realities

Instructor: Gerald Wilson

This seminar will examine the role of such myths as “rags to riches,” “beacon to the world,” the “frontier” and the “foreign devil” in defining the American character and determining the hopes, fears, dreams and actions of people throughout American History.

In addition to selected short readings, students will examine closely Arthur M. Schlesinger’s “The Disuniting of America,” David Potter’s “People of Plenty,” David Halberstam’s, “The Fifties,” John Hellmanns’, “American Myth and the Legacy of Viet Nam,” and Robert A. Rosenbloum and Gerald L. Wilson’s “The Value of Myth, Mythic Aspects of American History” (Course Pak). [Areas of Knowledge: CZ; Inquiries/Competencies: R]

History 195S.06- Leadership in American History

Instructor: Gerald Wilson

The seminar will focus on political, social, business, and artistic leaders in American history and problems which have called for leadership. In addition to selected short reading, students will examine closely the following: James MacGregor Burns’ “Leadership”; Walter Clark’s “Ox Bow Incident”; Niccolo Machiavelli’s “The Prince”; May and R. Neustadt’s “Thinking in Time”; Robert Penn Warren’s “All the King’s Men”; Gary Wills’ “Certain Trumpets”; and David Gergen’s “Eyewitness to Power.” [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Inquiries/Competencies: EI, R]

PPS 195.20 - High Impact Leadership

Instructors: Joe LeBoeuf, Mark Tribus

Leadership is one of the most compelling topics of our time, and might well be one of the most important attributes for effectiveness in all levels of human endeavor. The success of one of most admired and respected institutions in our country, the military, is founded on the understanding and effective application of leadership, and the development of leaders. Two legends in the field of management, Peter Drucker and Jack Welch, suggested that if you really want to understand leadership, look to the United States Military.

This course is designed to inspire an interest in the theory and practice of military leadership and to explore how these principles and practices might be applied to the civilian world of work. The course will explore topics such as values-based behavior [courage, trust, ethics], the professional code and warrior ethic, power and authority, individual motivation, cohesion, team and group effectiveness, crisis leadership and leadership in extremis [particularly the lessons of combat]. The format of the course will be an active-learning, small group, workshop-based educational experience that will leverage an array of guest speakers and presenters from the civilian and military world of leadership. [Areas of Knowledge: SS] APPROVED FOR MMS ELECTIVE

PPS 184S - The Photographic Essay

Instructor: Alex Harris

This seminar will examine the ways in which particular photographers have created photographic essays that communicate to a wide audience. Students will study the classic and contemporary masters of this form while creating their own photographic essays. Students will learn to choose, sequence, and pace images according to the format of their final presentation (book, magazine, exhibition, and web-based).

Three assigned projects to be completed by students during the semester as well as one final project combining images from these three essays. [Area of Knowledge: Arts, Literature, and Performance] PERMISSION REQUIRED

PPS 146 - Leadership, Development, and Organizations

Instructor: Stephanie Helms

This course aims to provide active student leaders with the knowledge, analytical competence, and skills needed to exercise ethical and effective leadership in student groups and campus organizations. Class sessions will explore issues that are critical to leaders and organizations on campus. Potential topics include organization theory, culture and diversity, followership, organizational change; strategy and planning; conflict resolution, decision-making and judgment, leader development and leadership succession, internal and external relations, and assessment and accountability.

The course is designed to help students complete a substantial campus organization consulting project. The projects’ objectives are: (1) to experience team interpersonal dynamics and leadership challenges under real life conditions; (2) to reflect upon and learn from the experience; (3) to produce tangible products and concrete recommendations that add value to student groups and campus organizations; and (4) to learn more about the unique context of the university community. Students serving in leadership roles on campus are encouraged to enroll. [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Modes of Inquiry: EI] Permission Required MMS CORE COURSE

PPS 144S - Social Enterprise Development (formerly Enterprising Leadership)

Instructor: Christopher Gergen

Become an entrepreneur. This seminar class takes a hands-on approach to teaching how to take a big idea and put it into action through a well designed business plan. Over the 14-weeks, you will create a social venture with a small team, participate in real-world case discussions, and develop an individualized entrepreneurial life plan. We will bring in accomplished entrepreneurs to share their stories and explore how to apply entrepreneurial principles to life decisions.

The goal of the course is to help students develop the leadership skills necessary to create high-impact social enterprises in the future and live an entrepreneurial life. [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Inquiries/Competencies: EI] PERMISSION REQUIRED

PPS 140S - Women as Leaders

Instructor: Rachel Seidman

This course will teach students to better understand the challenges and opportunities facing women in their quest to practice leadership in public life. Students will understand the historical roots of our conceptions of leadership and the ways American women have worked with, around and on those ideas over the last two centuries. They will analyze the current-day debates over women and leadership in the press and academic literature, and the relationship between theory and practice. Students will engage directly with these ideas in a hands-on final project. [Areas of Knowledge: SS]

PPS 137 - Adaptive Leadership

Instructor: Alma Blount

Capstone seminar for students completing community-based research (CBR) projects through the Service Opportunities in Leadership program. Involves critical reflection on summer projects, exploration of leadership, politics, and policy design concepts. With students’ experiences, questions, and insights as a starting point, this course explores how lives of commitment to the common good are formed and sustained. [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Inquiries/Competencies: EI, W, R] PERMISSION REQUIRED

PPS 134D - The Politics of Civic Engagement

Instructor: Robert Korstad

This course explores ethical issues related to civic engagement by college students, their reasons for participating, the goals of the university in sponsoring their summer experiences, and the impact they had on the people and organizations they worked with. Students will read books and articles from different political perspectives on the value and appropriateness of civic engagement. Required discussion sections will allow students to share the challenges of their own engagement. [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Inquiries/Competencies: CCI, EI]

PPS 49S.01 - Outside Myself: Documentary Writing and the Human Condition

Instructor: Alex Harris

This is a Freshman seminar for students who want to become better writers. The class explores the convergence of documentary writing and community service. Through the completion of regular documentary writing assignments, service work, the study and discussion of classic and contemporary documentary books, essays, and photographs, students will learn to create a distinctive and persuasive writing voice about issues of local, national, and international concern.

PPS 302: Policy Choice as Value Conflict

Instructor: Rachel Seidman

Topic: Empowering Women at Durham and at Duke
Community Partners: Durham Crisis Response Center (DCRC), The Women's Center of Durham (WCD), The Duke Women's Center
RSL Students: 15

PPS 301: Political Analysis in Public Policy

Instructor: Ken Rogerson

Topic: Dimensions of Environmental Policy
Community Partners: The Scrap Exchange, Carolina Biodiesel, The Eno River Association
RSL Students: 22

PPS 242: Education in Action

Instructor: Clara Muschkin

Topic: Political Engagement
Community Partners: YO: Durham (Year of Opportunity for Durham Teens), The Salvation Army Boys and Girls Club
RSL Students: 9

HISTORY 196S.06 - Leadership in American History

Instructor: Gerald Wilson

The seminar will focus on political, social, business, and artistic leaders in American history and problems which have called for leadership. In addition to selected short reading, students will examine closely the following: James MacGregor Burns’ “Leadership”; Walter Clark’s “Ox Bow Incident”; Niccolo Machiavelli’s “The Prince”; May and R. Neustadt’s “Thinking in Time”; Robert Penn Warren’s “All the King’s Men”; Gary Wills’ “Certain Trumpets”; and David Gergen’s “Eyewitness to Power.” [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Inquiries/Competencies: EI, R]

HISTORY 196S.05 - American Dreams/ American Realities

Instructor: Gerald Wilson

This seminar will examine the role of such myths as “rags to riches,” “beacon to the world,” the “frontier” and the “foreign devil” in defining the American character and determining the hopes, fears, dreams and actions of people throughout American History. In addition to selected short readings, students will examine closely Arthur M. Schlesinger’s “The Disuniting of America,” David Potter’s “People of Plenty,” David Halberstam’s, “The Fifties,” John Hellmanns’, “American Myth and the Legacy of Viet Nam,” and Robert A. Rosenbloum and Gerald L. Wilson’s “The Value of Myth, Mythic Aspects of American History” (Course Pak). [Areas of Knowledge: CZ; Inquiries/Competencies: R]

PPS 196 - Women as Leaders

Instructor: Ada Gregory

This course will teach students to better understand the challenges and opportunities facing women in their quest to practice leadership in public life. Students will understand the historical roots of our conceptions of leadership and the ways American women have worked with, around and on those ideas over the last two centuries. They will analyze the current-day debates over women and leadership in the press and academic literature, and the relationship between theory and practice. Students will engage directly with these ideas in a hands-on final project. [Areas of Knowledge: SS]

PPS 194 - Entrepreneurial Leadership & Social Innovation

Instructor: Christopher Gergen

Gateway course for the Entrepreneurial Leadership Initiative (ELI). Introduces students to the important frameworks of entrepreneurship, social innovation, and social enterprise development. Examines the dynamic relationship between social entrepreneurship and the public good through case studies, individual reflection, group projects, and experiential learning. Explores the challenges and triumphs of social entrepreneurship in areas of public concern such as education, community welfare, international development, and healthcare. Students will also have a chance to reflect on their own leadership path by developing a personalized entrepreneurial life plan.

Following the class, students will have an opportunity to develop their entrepreneurial ideas through a summer immersion experience in Durham and ELI’s fall capstone course, Social Enterprise Development. Successful enterprises are eligible for seed financing and incubation through the Duke Hatchery. [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Inquiries/Competencies: EI] PERMISSION REQUIRED ***APPROVED AS MMS ELECTIVE***

PPS 135- Border Crossing: Leadership, Value Conflicts & Public Life

Instructor: Alma Blount

Preparation course for students who plan to conduct community-based research projects in the summer through Service Opportunities in Leadership, or another research service learning opportunity. Through case studies about complex, difficult policy issues in our society, this course explores leadership as the art of working productively with value conflicts in groups, institutions, and social systems.

Includes training in basic research methods and ethics of human subjects research, completion of a 20-hour service project for a community organization, and exploration of a leadership framework for undertaking complex problem-solving work in the public arena. [Areas of Knowledge: SS, EI; Inquiries/Competencies: R, W] PERMISSION REQUIRED

PPS 49 - Terrorism and Democracy: Citizen Leadership and the Ethics of Security

Instructor: Steve Schewel

Since the devastating terrorist attack on the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001, American foreign policy has focused intensely on eliminating the threat that terrorists pose to our nation. President Bush took us to war in Afghanistan and Iraq, and President Obama’s administration is fighting those same wars today. Heightened security measures at home and abroad have led to extra-judicial internment of suspected terrorists, warrantless wire-tapping, covert operations, controversial interrogation methods and allegations of torture by American officials.

This course will involve you in a critical examination of the pressing ethical issues our nation faces associated with terrorism and counter-terrorism. These include the uses of violence, the concept of “just war,” entangling alliances with autocratic foreign governments, the tension in a democracy between rights and security, the meaning of patriotism, the character of dissent and the role of government secrecy. The course will emphasize the importance of citizens taking leadership to help our nation face its challenges. Students will practice essential leadership skills designed to help them effectively raise difficult public questions, to be self-reflective in the midst of action, to find the right allies and partners, to manage conflict, to provide a vision of a possible future, and to involve their communities in the work of change.

PPS 196.21: Who’s Democracy? Participation and Public Policy

Instructor: Kristin A. Goss

Topic: Housing Policy and Advocacy in Durham
Community Partners: Housing for New Hope, Durham Affordable Housing Coalition, Habitat for Humanity
RSL Students: 9

PPS 302: Policy Choice as Value Conflict

Instructor: Rachel Seidman

Topic: Empowering Women at Durham and at Duke
Community Partners: Durham Crisis Response Center (DCRC), North Carolina Against Domestic Violence, The Duke Women's Center
RSL Students: 10

PPS124.01 - CHILDREN IN CONTEMPORARY SOCIETY

Tuesday/Thursday 10:05 - 11:20 am

Instructor: Clara Muschkin

Major developmental stages of childhood and influences in a child’s life: parents/family life, schools, communities, the economy Emphasis on 1) applying of theory for analyzing complex societal problems (often involving issues of race, class, and gender; 2) using material and methodologies from psychology, sociology, economics, and public policy. Required course for certificate program Children in Contemporary Society, but open to all undergraduate students. [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Inquiries/Competencies: R]

DOC 193S - DOCUMENTARY ENGAGEMENT

Monday 3:05 - 5:35 pm

Instructor: Alex Harris

Documentary photography as a tool for social engagement in preparation for intensive field-based projects. Students study documentary photographers while planning and refining their own documentary projects through which they will address societal issues locally, nationally, or abroad.

Students learn and refine valuable technical skills such as Photoshop, inkjet printing, and web-based methods in order to complete a preliminary documentary project by the end of the semester. Required participation in service learning. [Areas of Knowledge: ALP] SERVICE LEARNING COURSE, PERMISSION REQUIRED

HISTORY 195 - LEADERSHIP IN AMERICAN HISTORY

Tuesday/Thursday 4:25 - 5:40 pm

Instructor: Gerald Wilson

The seminar will focus on political, social, business, and artistic leaders in American history and problems which have called for leadership. In addition to selected short reading, students will examine closely the following: James MacGregor Burns’ “Leadership”; Walter Clark’s “Ox Bow Incident”; Niccolo Machiavelli’s “The Prince”; May and R. Neustadt’s “Thinking in Time”; Robert Penn Warren’s “All the King’s Men”; Gary Wills’ “Certain Trumpets”; and David Gergen’s “Eyewitness to Power.” [Areas of Knowledge: CZ; Inquiries/Competencies: EI, R] PERMISSION REQUIRED

HISTORY 72D - AMERICAN DREAMS/AMERICAN REALITIES

Monday/Wednesday 11:40 - 12:55 pm

Instructor: Gerald Wilson

What does it mean to be an “American?” A French political scientist said, “To be a Frenchman is a fact; to be an American is an ideal.” What commonly shared ideals, ideas, “myths” define us as “Americans?” This course examines the role of some commonly shared myths as “rags to riches,” the “agrarian way of life,” the “frontier”, the “foreign devil” and the “City on a Hill” in defining the American character and determining our hopes, fears, dreams and actions through our history.

Attention will be given to the surface consistency of these myths as accepted by each immigrant group versus the shifting content of the myths as they change to reflect the hopes and values of each of these groups. [Areas of Knowledge: CZ; Inquiries/Competencies: CCI]

PPS195S.63 - TWENTYSOMETHING LEADERSHIP

Tues/Thurs 1:15 - 2:30 pm, Wednesday 4:40 - 5:30 pm

Instructor: Tony Brown

The central goal of Twentysomething Leadership is to provide students with the knowledge, analytical competence, and skills needed to exercise leadership as they navigate the transition from college to post-college life. The course explores the many facets of leadership and leadership development during the period of emerging adulthood, particularly in understanding how values can be aligned with professional, volunteer, and personal leadership for the benefit of others and to enhance personal development.

Not a course to be “taught,” Twentysomething Leadership focuses on a variety of experiential learning activities involving collaboration with alumni and graduate students, including case discussions, team projects, guest speakers, and personal reflection. The teaching method is interactive and experiential. [Areas of Knowledge: SS] PERMISSION REQUIRED

PPS 195S.61- CHANGEMAKER LEADERSHIP

Tuesday/Thursday 10:05 - 11:20 am, Thur 4:40 - 5:30 pm

Instructor: Tony Brown

The central goal of Changemaker Leadership is to provide highly motivated students with the educational opportunity to leverage their summer immersion experiences in a transformational manner. By acting on a passion to develop a promising idea, followed by a credible proposal, a compelling plan, and action, students will create a signature personal leadership experience. The course provides the knowledge, analytical competence, and leadership skills needed to accomplish this. Grounded in the social sciences, the course integrates theory and practice.

The teaching method is interactive and experiential and assumes that the students are highly motivated to be part of an action learning community. An innovative spirit drives progress in our society. Innovators demonstrate new ways to create sustainable social benefits by fusing a social mission, credible research and analysis, and effective leadership. These leaders have a clear and compelling moral purpose, they possess effective leadership skills and practical savvy, and they are emotionally engaged in their work. Above all, they embrace innovation as a way of life. The scope of public policy education is expanding to respond to the growing social and economic importance of social innovation and the need to create academic courses that address the unique challenges that social innovators face. Students need to be prepared for this new era in market-based social innovation. To realize their potential as social innovators, students need academic and co-curricular experiences that help them learn about and develop their own capacities and inspiration for social purpose innovation. A summer immersion experience and a strong commitment to act are prerequisites for admission to the course. A specific idea or proposal is not necessary. [Areas of Knowledge: SS] PERMISSION REQUIRED

PPS 195.20 - PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICES OF HIGH-IMPACT LEADERSHIP

Wednesday 3:05 - 5:35 pm

Instructor: Joe LeBoeuf

Leadership is one of the most compelling topics of our time, and might well be one of the most important attributes for effectiveness in all levels of human endeavor. The success of one of the most admired and respected institutions in our country, the military, is founded on the understanding and effective application of leadership, and the development of leaders. Two legends in the field of management, Peter Drucker and Jack Welch, suggested that if you really want to understand leadership, look to the United States Military.

This course is designed to inspire an interest in the theory and practice of military leadership and to explore how these principles and practices might be applied to the civilian world of work. The course will explore topics such as values-based behavior (courage, trust, ethics), the professional code and warrior ethic, power and authority, individual motivation, cohesion, team and group effectiveness, crisis leadership and leadership in extremis (particularly the lessons of combat). The format of the course will be an active-learning, small group, workshop-based educational experience that will leverage an array of guest speakers and presenters from the civilian and military world of leadership. [Areas of Knowledge: SS] APPROVED FOR MMS ELECTIVE

PPS 146 - LEADERSHIP, DEVELOPMENT, AND ORGANIZATIONS

Monday 2:50 - 5:20 pm

Instructor: Stephanie Helms

This course aims to provide active student leaders with the knowledge, analytical competence, and skills needed to exercise ethical and effective leadership in student groups and campus organizations. Class sessions will explore issues that are critical to leaders and organizations on campus. Potential topics include organization theory, culture and diversity, followership, organizational change; strategy and planning; conflict resolution, decision-making and judgment, leader development and leadership succession, internal and external relations, and assessment and accountability.

The course is designed to help students complete a substantial campus organization consulting project. The projects’ objectives are to help students: (1) experience team interpersonal dynamics and leadership challenges under real life conditions; (2) reflect upon and learn from the experience; (3) produce tangible products and concrete recommendations that add value to student groups and campus organizations; and (4) learn more about the unique context of the university community. Students serving in leadership roles on campus are encouraged to enroll. [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Inquiries/Competencies: EI] MMS CORE COURSE, PERMISSION REQUIRED

PPS 144S - SOCIAL ENTERPRISE DEVELOPMENT (formerly Enterprising Leadership)

Thursday 2:50 - 5:20 pm

Instructor: Christopher Gergen

Become an entrepreneur. This seminar class takes a hands-on approach to teaching students how to take a big idea and put it into action through a well designed business plan. Over the 14-weeks, students will create a social venture with a small team, participate in real-world case discussions, and develop an individualized entrepreneurial life plan. We will bring in accomplished entrepreneurs to share their stories and explore how to apply entrepreneurial principles to life decisions.

The goal of the course is to help students develop the leadership skills necessary to create high-impact social enterprises in the future and live an entrepreneurial life. [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Inquiries/Competencies: EI] PERMISSION REQUIRED

PPS 137 - ADAPTIVE LEADERSHIP

Wednesday 6:00 - 8:30 pm

Instructor: Alma Blount

Capstone seminar for students completing community-based research (CBR) projects through the Service Opportunities in Leadership program. Involves critical reflection on summer projects, exploration of leadership, politics, and policy design concepts. With students’ experiences, questions, and insights as a starting point, this course explores how lives of commitment to the common good are formed and sustained. [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Inquiries/Competencies: EI, W, R] PERMISSION REQUIRED

PPS49S.01 - THE PHOTOGRAPHIC ESSAY

Monday 8:45 - 11:15 am

Instructor: Alex Harris

Documentary field work course. Students create four distinct photographic essays, studying the ways other photographers have created photographic essays aimed at wide audiences. Students create, choose, sequence, and pace their images while studying classic and contemporary masters of photography. Prerequisite: First year and transfer students only; PERMISSION REQUIRED

PPS 242: Children in Contemporary Society

Instructor: Clara Muschkin

Topic: Education in Action
Community Partners: The Emily Krzyzewski Center, The Salvation Army Boys and Girls Club
RSL Students: 18

PPS 116D - POLICY CHOICE AS VALUE CONFLICT

Mon/Wed 2:50 - 4:05 pm, Sanford 03

Instructor: Robert Korstad

This course examines the ethical and moral complexities of public policy formation and implementation in the past and present. The aims of this course are 1.) To analyze and examine the varied moral foundations of public policy formation; 2.) To sharpen students’ capacity for ethical reasoning; and 3.) To locate contemporary policy debates within the broader historical contexts that have defined the moral and ethical dilemmas that policy makers and social actors currently face.

In addition to familiarizing students with the ideas of a number of political and social theorists, the course will also examine a variety of rich case studies from U.S. history that shed light on contemporary policy dilemmas. The course provides ample opportunities for reflecting upon the important but often neglected connections between ethics, history, and public policy formation and implementation. [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Inquiries/Competencies: EI]

HISTORY 196KS.01 - LEADERSHIP IN AMERICAN HISTORY

Tues/Thur 4:25 - 5:40 pm, Soc Psy 128

Instructor: Gerald Wilson

The seminar will focus on political, social, business, and artistic leaders in American history and problems which have called for leadership. In addition to selected short reading, students will examine closely the following: James MacGregor Burns’ “Leadership”; Walter Clark’s “Ox Bow Incident”; Niccolo Machiavelli’s “The Prince”; May and R. Neustadt’s “Thinking in Time”; Robert Penn Warren’s “All the King’s Men”; Gary Wills’ “Certain Trumpets”; and David Gergen’s “Eyewitness to Power.” [Areas of Knowledge: SS, Inquiries/Competencies: EI, R] PERMISSION REQUIRED

HISTORY 72D - AMERICAN DREAMS/AMERICAN REALITIES

Mon/Wed 11:55 - 12:45 pm, Soc Sci 136

Instructor: Gerald Wilson

This seminar will examine the role of such myths as “rags to riches,” “beacon to the world,” the “frontier” and the “foreign devil” in defining the American character and determining the hopes, fears, dreams and actions of people throughout American History.

Also, attention is given to the surface consistency of these myths as accepted by each immigrant group versus the shifting content of the myths as they change to reflect the hopes and values of each of these groups. [Areas of Knowledge: CZ; Inquiries/Competencies: R]

PPS196.30 - TWENTYSOMETHING LEADERSHIP

Tues/Thur 1:15 - 2:30 pm, Sanford 102

Instructor: Tony Brown

The central goal of Twentysomething Leadership is to provide students with the knowledge, analytical competence, and skills needed to exercise leadership as they navigate the transition from college to post-college life. The course explores the many facets of leadership and leadership development during the period of emerging adulthood, particularly in understanding how values can be aligned with professional, volunteer, and personal leadership for the benefit of others and to enhance personal development.

Not a course to be “taught,” Twentysomething Leadership focuses on a variety of experiential learning activities involving collaboration with alumni and graduate students, including case discussions, team projects, guest speakers, and personal reflection. The teaching method is interactive and experiential. Seniors Only. [Areas of Knowledge: SS]

PPS196S.24 - MORAL LEADERSHIP & COURAGE

Tues/Thur 10:05 - 11:20 am, Sanford 102

Instructor: Tony Brown

This course explores the many developmental facets of students’ moral courage, an outcome of the college experience. The course focuses on this topic at individual, organizational, and institutional levels. The core questions that the course addresses include: What is the meaning of moral courage to students? What are their codes of ethical values? In specific situations, how do they discern ethical issues and act based on their ethical values? Which personal ethical values are so important that students will accept risk to adhere to them? What would be the core elements of a plan to enhance the effect of the Duke experience on the development of students’ moral courage?

What leadership actions and resource commitments would make a material difference in the student’s development and, eventually, in the undergraduate student culture? What hypotheses can be developed and tested based on students, experiences and views? What can be discerned from a review of the literature? In what ways and in what situations is moral courage important to effective leadership? What can be learned from high- and low-profile moral leaders in history? Specifically, what is the relevance of the notion of moral leadership to college students and recent graduates? Moral courage is defined as the strength of mind and spirit that enables one to understand the ethical dimensions of challenges and to act effectively on the basis of personal principles in spite of the known risks. [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Inquiries/Competencies: EI]

PPS 194 - LEADING AS A SOCIAL ENTREPRENEUR

Tues/Thur 4:25 - 5:40 pm, Rubenstein Hall 151

Instructor: Christopher Gergen

An introduction to social entrepreneurship and entrepreneurial leadership, PPS 194 is geared toward students seeking a challenging learning experience that enables them to enhance their community as entrepreneurial leaders. Through this interactive class, students learn how to put a promising idea for social change into action. Students work to create an “entrepreneurial life plan,” reflecting upon their personal path to creating a life that is in line with their passions and goals.

Students apply these skills in the context of a summer experience that aligns with their articulated entrepreneurial path. PPS 194 students demonstrate the following: An eagerness to learn about social entrepreneurship and entrepreneurial leadership-and to put this knowledge into practice; enthusiasm toward learning more about their personal strengths and leadership style and how these can be applied to their personal and professional lives; a desire to think “out of the box” about their next summer experience and to define a plan that has the potential to make a real difference in a community, local or global. Freshmen and sophomores only. [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Inquiries/Competencies: EI] ***APPROVED AS MMS ELECTIVE***

PPS 140S.01 - WOMEN AS LEADERS

Mon 2:50 - 5:20 pm, Sanford 225

Instructor: Rachel Seidman

This course will teach students to better understand the challenges and opportunities facing women in their quest to practice leadership in public life. Students will understand the historical roots of our conceptions of leadership and the ways American women have worked with, around and on those ideas over the last two centuries.

They will analyze the current-day debates over women and leadership in the press and academic literature, and the relationship between theory and practice. Students will engage directly with these ideas in a hands-on final project. [Areas of Knowledge: SS]

PPS 135 - BORDER CROSSING: LEADERSHIP, VALUE CONFLICTS & PUBLIC LIFE

Tues/Thur 10:05 - 11:20 am; Wed 11:55 - 12:45 pm, Rubenstein Hall 149

Instructor: Alma Blount

This is the preparation course for students who plan to conduct community-based research projects in the summer through Service Opportunities in Leadership, or another research service-learning opportunity. Through case studies about complex, difficult policy issues in our society, this course explores leadership as the art of working productively with value conflicts in groups, institutions, and social systems.

Includes training in basic research methods and ethics of human subject research, completion of a 20-hour service project for a community organization, and exploration of a leadership framework for undertaking complex problem-solving work in the public arena. [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Inquiries/Competencies: EI, R, W] PERMISSION REQUIRED

PPS 49 - NARRATIVE AND LEADERSHIP

Mon/Wed 10:05 - 11:20 am, Sanford 102

Instructor: Frederick Mayer

This course explores the role of stories and storytelling in public leadership. It will consider the ways in which stories operate in mind and culture, forming beliefs and attitudes, constructing identity, and motivating behavior. Through examples drawn from social movements, political campaigns, presidential leadership, community initiatives, and sports, students will learn how stories motivate leaders and move communities, and develop storytelling as a leadership skill. [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Inquiries/Competencies: EI, First Year Students Only]

PPS 302: Policy Choice as Value Conflict

Instructor: Robert Korstad

Topic: Ethical Dimensions of Poverty Alleviation
Community Partners: Genesis Home, Interfaith Food Shuttle, The Durham Nativity School
RSL Students: 11

PPS 124.01 Children in Contemporary Society

Tuesday/Thursday 10:05 – 11:20 am, Rubenstein Hall 149

Instructor: Clara Muschkin

This course takes an interdisciplinary approach to examining the issues facing today’s youth, from childhood through adolescence. Students will begin by exploring the forces that shape the definition of childhood across place and time, and review how different social science disciplines study childhood.

They will then consider the many social contexts of childhood, including the family, schools, the economy, race, and gender. One of the objectives of this course is to gain an understanding of issues of childhood adversity—including poverty, abuse and violence, deviance and delinquency, and health inequities—and some of the public policies that address these issues. [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Inquiries/Competencies: W]

PPS 114 - POLITICAL ANALYSIS AND PUBLIC POLICY MAKING

Monday/Wednesday 2:50 - 4:05, Sanford 03

Instructor: Ken Rogerson

This course focuses on the political processes in public policymaking, including both processes and actors -- whether they are agencies, legislatures, individuals or interest groups. Learning to analyze politics involves understanding relationships between actors and how they see themselves having an influence (consciously or unconsciously) on the policymaking process. Emphasis will be placed on developing the skills necessary to perform political analysis and writing about it.

The course will be divided into three sections: 1) actors and players in the policymaking process; 2) the policymaking process; and 3) policy issue areas. [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Inquiries/Competencies: W]

HISTORY 196 - LEADERSHIP IN AMERICAN HISTORY

Tuesday/Thursday 4:25 - 5:40 pm, Soc Psy 128

Instructor: Gerald Wilson

The seminar will focus on political, social, business, and artistic leaders in American history and problems which have called for leadership. In addition to selected short reading, students will examine closely the following: James MacGregor Burns' "Leadership"; Walter Clark's "Ox Bow Incident"; Niccolo Machiavelli's "The Prince"; May and R. Neustadt's "Thinking in Time"; Robert Penn Warren's "All the King's Men"; Gary Wills' "Certain Trumpets"; and David Gergen's "Eyewitness to Power." [Areas of Knowledge: CZ; Inquiries/Competencies: EI, R] PERMISSION REQUIRED

HISTORY 72D - AMERICAN DREAMS/AMERICAN REALITIES

Monday/Wednesday 11:55 - 12:45 pm, Social Sciences 136

Instructor: Gerald Wilson

What does it mean to be an "American?" A French political scientist said, "To be a Frenchman is a fact; to be an American is an ideal." What commonly shared ideals, ideas, "myths" define us as "Americans?" This course examines the role of some commonly shared myths as "rags to riches," the "agrarian way of life," the "frontier", the "foreign devil" and the "City on a Hill" in defining the American character and our hopes, fears, dreams and actions through our history.

Attention will be given to the surface consistency of these myths as accepted by each immigrant group versus the shifting content of the myths as they change to reflect the hopes and values of each of these groups. [Areas of Knowledge: CZ; Inquiries/Competencies: CCI]

PPS 194 - LEADING AS A SOCIAL ENTREPRENEUR

Tuesday/Thursday 4:25 - 5:40 pm, Rubenstein Hall 153

Instructor: Christopher Gergen

A dynamic introduction to social entrepreneurship and entrepreneurial leadership, PPS194 is for students seeking an understanding of how innovative approaches to social change are created and implemented. Students will also be challenged to reflect on their own emerging leadership potential and how one embarks on a life of purpose.

Through the course content and research assignments, students will be exposed to important examples of social entrepreneurs and their enterprises while gaining a comprehensive understanding of the social innovation process. Students will apply this knowledge by going through the process of identifying a community need, and embarking upon the beginning stages of developing a promising idea for innovative intervention. Students will also work to create an "entrepreneurial life plan," reflecting upon their personal path to creating an extraordinary life that is in line with their passions and goals while enhancing their communities as entrepreneurial leaders. MARKETS AND MANAGEMENT CERTIFICATE - ELECTIVE COURSE [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Inquiries/Competencies: EI]

PPS 168 - DOCUMENTARY ENGAGEMENT

Monday 11:40 - 2:10 pm, Bridges House 104

Instructor: Alex Harris

In this seminar students will learn to use documentary photography and audio as tools for social engagement. The class will focus on the documentary work students create on one theme throughout the semester. Students will study policy issues related to that theme. They will also examine classic and contemporary documentary photography and audio to help give context and shape to their own documentary work.

The fall 2011 seminar will focus on homelessness in Durham. Students will work closely with Housing for New Hope (HNH), a local agency that provides services for homeless and formerly homeless individuals and families. Working with HNH staff members, students will come to know and document the lives and stories of these individuals. Students will learn and refine valuable technical skills such as photoshop and Final Cut Pro in order to complete a multi-media documentary project by the end of the semester. As a class we will develop a web-based multi-media portrait of homelessness in Durham featuring the combined photographs and audio portraits students produce.  SERVICE LEARNING COURSE [Areas of Knowledge: ALP] PERMISSION REQUIRED

PPS 146 - LEADERSHIP, DEVELOPMENT, AND ORGANIZATIONS

Wednesday/Friday 10:05 - 11:20 am, Rubenstein Hall 153

Instructor: Tony Brown

This course is designed to provide an engaging and stimulating climate for students to explore leadership, leadership development and the other themes of the course. The core pedagogy of the course focuses on experiential learning activities, including a personal leadership plan, a team-based community leadership project, case discussions, readings, guest speakers, and personal reflection.

Class topics include the meaning of leadership, leadership development, personal character and values, worldviews and citizenship, leadership attributes and behaviors, organizational change, strategy and planning, conflict resolution, and decision-making and judgment. MARKETS AND MANAGEMENT CERTIFICATE - CORE COURSE, SERVICE-LEARNING COURSE [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Inquiries/Competencies: EI]

PPS144S - SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP IN ACTION

Wednesday/Friday 1:15 - 2:30 pm, Sanford 102

Instructor: Tony Brown

The central goal of Social Entrepreneurship in Action is to provide students with knowledge, analytical perspectives, and experiences important to understanding social entrepreneurship as a major contemporary force addressing problems in our society. Grounded in the social sciences, PPS144's integrates theory and practice. The teaching method is interactive and experiential.

Teams of students will define a promising idea and develop a compelling plan that addresses a real problem or opportunity in the Duke or Durham communities, with the objectives of creating meaningful learning experiences for themselves and something of enduring value for the community. Central PPS144's themes include students' education and development by working in teams to develop compelling plans (including credible data and actual results that validate the opportunity and the projects' potential). A number of students will decide to pilot-test and subsequently launch their projects following the end of the course. Others will decide not to continue with their projects. MARKETS AND MANAGEMENT CERTIFICATE - CORE COURSE,SERVICE-LEARNING COURSE [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Inquiries/Competencies: EI] PERMISSION REQUIRED

PPS 137 - ADAPTIVE LEADERSHIP

Wednesday 6:00 - 8:30 pm, Sanford 150

Instructor: Alma Blount

Capstone seminar for students completing community-based research (CBR) projects through the Service Opportunities in Leadership program. Involves critical reflection on summer projects, exploration of leadership, politics, and policy design concepts. With students' experiences, questions, and insights as a starting point, this course explores how lives of commitment to the common good are formed and sustained. [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Inquiries/Competencies: EI, W, R] PERMISSION REQUIRED

PPS 242: Children in Contemporary Society

Instructor: Clara Muschkin

Topic: Education in Action
Community Partners: Genesis Home, The Salvation Army Boys and Girls Club
RSL Students: 8

PPS 301: Political Analysis in Public Policy

Instructor: Ken Rogerson

Topic: Family and Child Services
Community Partners: Durham's Partnership for Children, Durham Performance Learning Center, Durham Exchange Club's Family Center
RSL Students: 17

PPS188.01 – WHOSE DEMOCRACY? PARTICIPATION AND PUBLIC POLICY IN THE UNITED STATES

Mon/Wed 2:50-4:05 pm, Sanford 225

Instructor: Kristin A. Goss

Overview of patterns in Americans' engagement and disengagement from civic life. Examination of why people do (and do not) participate. Skews based on gender, race, ideology, and class differences. Role of American interest groups and social movements in policy change. Influence of public policies (e.g., federal tax laws, participation requirements, and programs such as AmeriCorps) on civic and political participation.

Classroom discussion; short memos; and team-based "research service learning" component, consisting of research-based policy memo for Durham-area grassroots organization and 10 hours of direct service. SERVICE-LEARNING COURSE [Areas of Knowledge: SS, Inquiries/Competencies: R]

PPS116D.003 –POLICY CHOICE AS VALUE CONFLICT

Tues/Thurs 1:15 - 2:30 pm, Sanford 03

Instructor: Robert Korstad

This course examines the ethical and moral complexities of public policy formation and implementation in the past and present. The aims of this course are 1) to analyze and examine the varied moral foundations of public policy formation; 2) to sharpen students’ capacity for ethical reasoning; and 3) to locate contemporary policy debates within the broader historical contexts that have defined the moral and ethical dilemmas that policy makers and social actors currently face.

In addition to familiarizing students with the ideas of a number of political and social theorists, the course will also examine a variety of rich case studies from U.S. history that shed light on contemporary policy dilemmas. The course provides ample opportunities for reflecting upon the important but often neglected connections between ethics, history, and public policy formation and implementation. [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Inquiries/Competencies: EI]

History 196KS.01 – Leadership in American History

Tues/Thur 4:25 - 5:40 pm, Soc Sci 109

Instructor: Gerald Wilson

The seminar will focus on political, social, business, and artistic leaders in American history and problems which have called for leadership. In addition to selected short reading, students will examine closely the following: James MacGregor Burns’ "Leadership"; Walter Clark’s "Ox Bow Incident"; Niccolo Machiavelli’s "The Prince"; May and R. Neustadt’s "Thinking in Time"; Robert Penn Warren’s "All the King's Men"; Gary Wills’ "Certain Trumpets"; and David Gergen’s "Eyewitness to Power." [Areas of Knowledge: SS, Inquiries/Competencies: EI, R] PERMISSION REQUIRED

History 72D – American Dreams/American Realities

Mon/Wed 11:55 - 12:45 pm, Soc Psy 126

Instructor: Gerald Wilson

This seminar will examine the role of such myths as "rags to riches," "beacon to the world," the "frontier" and the "foreign devil" in defining the American character and determining the hopes, fears, dreams and actions of people throughout American History. Also, attention is given to the surface consistency of these myths as accepted by each immigrant group versus the shifting content of the myths as they change to reflect the hopes and values of each of these groups. [Areas of Knowledge: CZ; Inquiries/Competencies: R]

PPS 195S-30 – MORAL COURAGE & LEADERSHIP

Tues/Thur 10:05 – 11:20 am, Sanford 150

Instructor: Tony Brown

Students will explore the issue of moral courage development at Duke University. A central premise of the course is that the college experience affects the development of students’ moral foundations. One way to make this seemingly abstract topic more specific is to ask the questions, “What is the best way to spend $1,000,000 to enhance the impact of the Duke experience on the development of students’ moral courage?” and “What can Duke students do to exercise leadership in the development of moral courage for their peers?”

More a course in moral development than ethics theory, students will develop specific, compelling strategies and recommendations to be implemented in one—and three—years. These strategies and recommendations will be based on clear definitions and rigorous analysis. Students will work in teams as part of a collaborative, coordinated class project. The spring 2012 class will build on the work of the spring 2011 class in developing the plan. In addition, students will develop their own personal moral codes and moral development plans. MARKETS AND MANAGEMENT CERTIFICATE [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Inquiries/Competencies: EI]

PPS 145 – LEADERSHIP, POLICY AND CHANGE

Monday 2:50 – 5:20 pm, Sanford 102

Instructor: Alma Blount

This seminar will focus on the policy questions, arguments, and options we formulate together after reading three new, provocative books:

  • The Great Disruption, about the global climate crisis and what the author calls “the end of Economic Growth Version 1.0”—a world economy where it will no longer be an option to live beyond the means of our resources;
  • The Big Thirst, about understanding and managing our most precious resource—water; and
  • Hot, about global warming and our options for skillfully confronting the new era that is already upon us.
  • We will begin our work by exploring concepts of leadership and authority. We will investigate how leadership and authority are related but contrasting functions that work in creative tension with each other and can manifest in both healthy and unhealthy ways in organizations, institutions and social systems. By reading case studies and news stories, and also by observing our own group dynamics, we will take note of the ways that one can exercise leadership and authority skillfully to help groups face difficult challenges. Throughout the semester we will also immerse ourselves in readings about democratic participation, group decision-making, and public deliberation. Small group projects will include researching both the counter arguments and the supporting arguments that issue from our core texts—The Great Disruption, The Big Thirst, and Hot. Each group will be asked to find simple, effective ways to “go public” with their work—to bring the group’s analysis and questions to wider audiences for discussion and debate. [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Inquiries/Competencies: EI]

PPS 144S – SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP IN ACTION

Tues/Thur 1:15 – 2:30, Rubenstein Hall 149

Instructor: Tony Brown

Social Entrepreneurship in Action is a leadership course in applied social innovation. The central goal of the course is to provide students with an academic opportunity to leverage their experiences and interests to create social innovation initiatives. More than a traditional social entrepreneurship education course, the course design is based on the principle that significant learning and development are results of creating projects that will actually benefit others.

The course integrates theory and practice (more practice to theory than vice-versa) in providing students with knowledge, analytical competence, and leadership skills important to exercising social entrepreneurship. Teams of students will develop a promising idea, followed sequentially by a credible proposal, and a compelling plan. Following the end of the course, many students will pilot-test and subsequently launch projects that become signature accomplishments. MARKETS AND MANAGEMENT CERTIFICATE – CORE COURSE, SERVICE-LEARNING COURSE [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Inquiries/Competencies: EI] Permission Required

PPS 140S.01 - WOMEN AS LEADERS

Thursday 2:50 - 5:20 pm, Sanford 224

Instructor: Katie Hood

The title of this course is so obvious, and yet it is not. This is a class about women and leadership, but what does that mean? We will explore a dynamic framework for analyzing leadership where leading is not restricted to “born leaders,” but is seen as an amalgam of accessible elements that include one’s situation, sense of purpose, orientation to results, authenticity, courage and self-awareness.

We will discuss women as leaders in society—primarily in the United States, but also in international contexts. Although women have made broad strides, there is still subtle—and sometimes not so subtle—evidence that barriers continue for women in leadership roles. We will ask the question – thirty years after women became the majority of college graduates in the U.S., why are only 3% of Fortune 500 CEO’s women? And while women have made great progress in developing public personas and attaining elected office, why are so few of our senior officeholders women? We will explore root causes for these leadership roadblocks, not to complain, but to move past and generate ideas for solutions. Throughout the course, we will investigate individual stories of women leaders to more deeply understand leadership theory in action and gender differences in leadership. We will read case studies and biographies, view documentaries, and engage women leaders in frank conversation as we work to refine our insights about these complex issues. [Areas of Knowledge: SS]

PPS 135 – BORDER CROSSING: LEADERSHIP, VALUE CONFLICTS & PUBLIC LIFE

Tues/Thur 10:05 - 11:20 am; Wed 11:55 - 12:45 pm, Rubenstein Hall 149

Instructor: Alma Blount

This is the preparation course for students who plan to conduct community-based research projects in the summer through Service Opportunities in Leadership, or another research service-learning opportunity. Through case studies about complex, difficult policy issues in our society, this course explores leadership as the art of working productively with value conflicts in groups, institutions, and social systems.

The course includes training in basic research methods and ethics of human subject research, completion of a 20-hour service project for a community organization, and exploration of a leadership framework for undertaking complex problem-solving work in the public arena. [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Inquiries/Competencies: EI, R, W] PERMISSION REQUIRED

PPS 49 – NARRATIVE AND LEADERSHIP

Tues/Thur 11:40 - 12:55 pm, Sanford 150

Instructor: Frederick Mayer

This course explores the role of stories and storytelling in public leadership. It will consider the ways in which stories operate in mind and culture, forming beliefs and attitudes, constructing identity, and motivating behavior. Through examples drawn from social movements, political campaigns, presidential leadership, community initiatives, and sports, students will learn how stories motivate leaders and move communities, and develop storytelling as a leadership skill. [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Inquiries/Competencies: EI, First Year Students Only] PERMISSION REQUIRED

PPS 302: Policy Choice as Value Conflict

Instructor: Robert Korstad

Topic: Ethical Dimensions of Poverty Alleviation
Community Partners: Durham Performance Learning Center, Habitat for Humanity International, DNS, Durham C.A.N, Acción Emprendedora (AE), Durham Crisis Response Center
RSL Students: 27

PPS 188: Who’s Democracy? Participation and Public Policy

Instructor: Kristin A. Goss

Topic: Immigration and Multiculturalism
Community Partner: ENLACES
RSL Students: 6

PPS 242S.01 (PPS124.01) - CHILDREN IN CONTEMPORARY SOCIETY

Tuesday/Thursday 10:05 – 11:20 am, SB 225

Instructor: Clara Muschkin

This course takes an interdisciplinary approach to examining the issues facing today’s youth, from childhood through adolescence. Students will begin by exploring the forces that shape the definition of childhood across place and time, and review how different social science disciplines study childhood.

They will then consider the many social contexts of childhood, including the family, schools, the economy, race, and gender. One of the objectives of this course is to gain an understanding of issues of childhood adversity—including poverty, abuse and violence, deviance and delinquency, and health inequities—and some of the public policies that address these issues. [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Inquiries/Competencies: W]

History 470S.01 (HST196) – LEADERSHIP IN AMERICAN HISTORY

Tuesday/Thursday 4:40 – 5:55 pm, Soc Psy 128

Instructor: Gerald Wilson

The seminar will focus on political, social, business, and artistic leaders in American history and problems which have called for leadership. In addition to selected short reading, students will examine closely the following: James MacGregor Burns’ "Leadership"; Walter Clark’s "Ox Bow Incident"; Niccolo Machiavelli’s "The Prince"; May and R. Neustadt’s "Thinking in Time"; Robert Penn Warren’s "All the King's Men"; Gary Wills’ "Certain Trumpets"; and David Gergen’s "Eyewitness to Power." [Areas of Knowledge: CZ; Inquiries/Competencies: EI, R] Permission Required

History 377D (HST72D) – AMERICAN DREAMS/AMERICAN REALITIES

Monday/Wednesday 11:45 - 12:35 pm, Social Sciences 136

Instructor: Gerald Wilson

What does it mean to be an “American?” A French political scientist said, “To be a Frenchman is a fact; to be an American is an ideal.” What commonly shared ideals, ideas, “myths” define us as “Americans?” This course examines the role of some commonly shared myths as “rags to riches,” the “agrarian way of life,” the “frontier”, the “foreign devil” and the “City on a Hill” in defining the American character and determining our hopes, fears, dreams and actions through our history.

Attention will be given to the surface consistency of these myths as accepted by each immigrant group versus the shifting content of the myths as they change to reflect the hopes and values of each of these groups. [Areas of Knowledge: CZ; Inquiries/Competencies: CCI]

PPS 396S.01 (PPS 168) – DOCUMENTARY ENGAGEMENT

Monday 10:05 – 12:35 pm, Bridges House 104

Instructor: Liisa Ogburn

In this seminar students will learn to use documentary photography and audio as tools for social engagement in preparation for intensive field-based summer community documentary projects that contribute to the public good. Students will also examine classic and contemporary documentary audio and photography to help give context and shape to their own documentary work.

The class will focus on one of the most serious health problems facing American youth: obesity. Students will be paired with teens enrolled in Duke’s Healthy Lifestyle program at Duke Children’s Hospital. As a service learning course, each student will be paired with a teens, providing support, as needed, and/or helping with the Active Teens program held at the Lenox Baker Center. At the same time, students will be documenting their lives and stories. Students will learn and refine valuable technical skills such as Photoshop and Premier, in order to complete a 4-6 minute multimedia documentary portrait by the end of the semester. These portraits will convey what it means to change health behaviors, and may be used in medical education, policy and public health efforts, as well as for patient education, motivation and empowerment. Liisa Ogburn runs the Documenting Medicine program at Duke, which provides medical residents with the skills and equipment to use documentary to explore patient and provider stories. SERVICE LEARNING COURSE [Areas of Knowledge: ALP], Permission Required

PPS 265.01 (PPS 146) – LEADERSHIP, DEVELOPMENT, AND ORGANIZATIONS

Wednesday/Friday 1:25 – 2:40 pm, RH 151

Instructor: Tony Brown

This course is designed to provide an engaging and stimulating climate for students to explore leadership, leadership development and the other themes of the course. The core pedagogy of the course focuses on experiential learning activities, including a personal leadership plan, a team-based community leadership project, case discussions, readings, guest speakers, and personal reflection.

Class topics include the meaning of leadership, leadership development, personal character and values, worldviews and citizenship, leadership attributes and behaviors, organizational change, strategy and planning, conflict resolution, and decision-making and judgment. MARKETS AND MANAGEMENT CERTIFICATE – CORE COURSE, SERVICE-LEARNING COURSE [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Inquiries/Competencies: EI]

PPS 264.01(PPS137) – ADAPTIVE LEADERSHIP

Wednesday 6:15 – 8:45 pm, Sanford 150

Instructor: Alma Blount

Capstone seminar for students completing community-based research (CBR) projects through the Service Opportunities in Leadership program. Involves critical reflection on summer projects, exploration of leadership, politics, and policy design concepts. With students' experiences, questions, and insights as a starting point, this course explores how lives of commitment to the common good are formed and sustained. [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Inquiries/Competencies: EI, W, R] PERMISSION REQUIRED

PPS 259S.01 (PPS 140S.01) - WOMEN AS LEADERS

Tuesday 3:05 - 5:35 pm, Sanford 225

Instructor: Katie Hood

The title of this course is so obvious, and yet it is not. This is a class about women and leadership, but what does that mean? We will explore a dynamic framework for analyzing leadership where leading is not restricted to “born leaders,” but is seen as an amalgam of accessible elements that include one’s situation, sense of purpose, orientation to results, authenticity, courage and self-awareness.

We will discuss women as leaders in society—primarily in the United States, but also in international contexts. Although women have made broad strides, there is still subtle—and sometimes not so subtle—evidence that barriers continue for women in leadership roles. We will ask the question – thirty years after women became the majority of college graduates in the U.S., why are only 3% of Fortune 500 CEO’s women? And while women have made great progress in developing public personas and attaining elected office, why are so few of our senior officeholders women? We will explore root causes for these leadership roadblocks, not to complain, but to move past and generate ideas for solutions. Throughout the course, we will investigate individual stories of women leaders to more deeply understand leadership theory in action and gender differences in leadership. We will read case studies and biographies, view documentaries, and engage women leaders in frank conversation as we work to refine our insights about these complex issues. [Areas of Knowledge: SS]

PPS 190FS.03 – ENTERPRISING LEADERSHIP & CIVIC ENGAGEMENT (New Course-Focus Program Students Only)

Wednesday/Friday 10:05 – 11:20 am, Sanford 150

Instructor: Tony Brown

The course explores ways that students can exercise innovative, resourceful leadership to address important civic issues with and external to Duke University. The course will investigate the fundamental civic issues of citizenship, community, equity and wellness while addressing underlying questions about individual and group empathy, integrity, and agency. Students will write a personal civic engagement leadership plan and a number of short papers. Student teams will develop practical initiatives that address an important civic issue at Duke based on an experiential pedagogy of “action-based, integrated learning experiences,” in which student teams apply classroom theory and experiences in a project that addresses a real issue and produces real results during the semester.

A successful project requires the development and application of knowledge (theory and situation specific), thorough analysis, and good judgment. Success also requires highly-engaged students. The most engaged students are likely to have a keen interest in civic engagement and value action-based, integrated learning experiences. [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Inquiries/Competencies: EI] /SERVICE LEARNING COURSE/ PERMISSION REQUIRED

PPS 242: Children in Contemporary Society

Instructor: Clara Muschkin

Topic: Education in Action
Community Partner: Genesis Home
RSL Students: 4

PPS301.01 (PPS114) – POLITICAL ANALYSIS FOR PUBLIC POLICY-MAKING

Tuesday/Thursday 11:45 – 1:00 pm, Sanford 04

Instructor: Nick Carnes

This course examines the analysis of the political and organizational processes which influence the formulation and implementation of public policy. Prerequisite: Public Policy 155D. [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Inquiries/Competencies: W]

PPS232.01 (PPS166) – THE INSURGENT SOUTH

Tuesday/Thursday 1:25 - 2:40 pm, Sanford 05; Wednesday 1:40 - 2:30 pm, Trent 039A

Instructor: Robert Korstad

This course examines social movements in the South from Reconstruction to the present. Including Populism, Women's Suffrage, and the Interracial Movement, labor, civil rights, and post-1960s conservatism. Attention to public policy positions espoused by social movement organizations and activists. Lecture/discussion. Weekly writing assignments. [Areas of Knowledge: SS, CZ] PERMISSION REQUIRED

History 470S (HST196KS.01) – LEADERSHIP IN AMERICAN HISTORY

Tuesday/Thursday 4:40 - 5:55 pm, Soc Psy 128

Instructor: Gerald Wilson

The seminar will focus on political, social, business, and artistic leaders in American history and problems which have called for leadership. In addition to selected short reading, students will examine closely the following: James MacGregor Burns’ "Leadership"; Walter Clark’s "Ox Bow Incident"; Niccolo Machiavelli’s "The Prince"; May and R. Neustadt’s "Thinking in Time"; Robert Penn Warren’s "All the King's Men"; Gary Wills’ "Certain Trumpets"; and David Gergen’s "Eyewitness to Power." [Areas of Knowledge: SS, Inquiries/Competencies: EI, R] PERMISSION REQUIRED

History 377D (HST72) – AMERICAN DREAMS/AMERICAN REALITIES

Monday /Wednesday 11:45 - 12:35 pm, Soc Sci 136

Instructor: Gerald Wilson

This seminar will examine the role of such myths as "rags to riches," "beacon to the world," the "frontier" and the "foreign devil" in defining the American character and determining the hopes, fears, dreams and actions of people throughout American History. Also, attention is given to the surface consistency of these myths as accepted by each immigrant group versus the shifting content of the myths as they change to reflect the hopes and values of each of these groups. [Areas of Knowledge: CZ; Inquiries/Competencies: R]

PPS 271S.01 (PPS 144S) – SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP IN ACTION

Tuesday/Thursday 10:05 –11:20 am, Sanford 150

Instructor: Tony Brown

Social Entrepreneurship in Action is a leadership course in applied social innovation. The central goal of the course is to provide students with an academic opportunity to leverage their experiences and interests to create social innovation initiatives. More than a traditional social entrepreneurship education course, the course design is based on the principle that significant learning and development are results of creating projects that will actually benefit others.

The course integrates theory and practice (more practice to theory than vice-versa) in providing students with knowledge, analytical competence, and leadership skills important to exercising social entrepreneurship. Teams of students will develop a promising idea, followed sequentially by a credible proposal, and a compelling plan. Following the end of the course, many students will pilot-test and subsequently launch projects that become signature accomplishments. MARKETS AND MANAGEMENT CERTIFICATE – CORE COURSE, SERVICE-LEARNING COURSE [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Inquiries/Competencies: EI] Permission Required

PPS 270.01 (PPS136) – CIVIC PARTICIPATION/COMMUNITY LEADERSHIP

Monday/Wednesday 11:45 – 1:00 pm, Sanford 150

Instructor: Steve Schewel

For our nation to prosper over the next fifty years, our cities must succeed. This success, if it comes, will be hard won. From New York to Los Angeles to Durham, our cities are challenged by the sharp divisions of race, language and ethnicity; by the influx of new immigrants; by diminishing support from state and federal government; by aging infrastructure, lack of affordable housing, environmental degradation, drugs, crime and poverty.

At the same time, city dwellers across the country are consciously nourishing their own urban revival. We see everywhere the reclamation of abandoned downtowns, the retrofitting of brick factories into offices and shops, the explosion of high-end restaurants and an obsessive food culture, new theaters and stadiums in the middle of downtown. So the questions arise: Who will share in this urban revival? Is it reserved only for a prosperous metropolitan elite? Or can the rebirth of cities include alliances across the lines of race, class, ethnicity and culture to attack our most intransigent social problems together? Enrollment for this class is limited, so the class will be taught in the seminar style. Seated around the seminar table, we will learn together, and your participation and ideas will be crucial to the success of our class. Our reading and discussion will involve us in a critical examination of the pressing strategic and ethical issues we face if our cities are to survive and prosper. Along the way, each of you will focus on your own role as a potential civic participant and community leader in our common national effort to make our cities work. [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Inquiries/Competencies: EI]

PPS 265.01 (PPS 146) – LEADERSHIP, DEVELOPMENT, AND ORGANIZATIONS

Tuesday/Thursday 1:25 – 2:40 pm, Sanford 04

Instructor: Tony Brown

This course is designed to provide an engaging and stimulating climate for students to explore leadership, leadership development and the other themes of the course. The core pedagogy of the course focuses on experiential learning activities, including a personal leadership plan, a team-based community leadership project, case discussions, readings, guest speakers, and personal reflection. Class topics include the meaning of leadership, leadership development, personal character and values, worldviews and citizenship, leadership attributes and behaviors, organizational change, strategy and planning, conflict resolution, and decision-making and judgment. MARKETS AND MANAGEMENT CERTIFICATE – CORE COURSE, SERVICE-LEARNING COURSE [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Inquiries/Competencies: EI] PERMISSION REQUIRED

PPS263.01 (PPS135) – BORDER CROSSING: LEADERSHIP, VALUE CONFLICTS & PUBLIC LIFE

Tuesday/Thursday 10:05 - 11:20 am, Rubenstein Hall 149; Wednesday 10:20 - 11:10 am - TBD

Instructor: Alma Blount

This is the preparation course for students who plan to conduct community-based research in the summer through Service Opportunities in Leadership (SOL) or another research service-learning opportunity. We have designed this course to provide you with theoretical knowledge and critical reflection skills for entering other cultures to work with community organizations.

You will receive training in basic research methods, and conduct a service project for a community partner organization. You will also be introduced to a leadership framework for analyzing complex problem solving work that requires wading into controversy—and learning to work with it productively—in order mobilize groups, institutions and systems to do difficult work.
Class final essay
Class reflections by a student

PPS260.01 (PPS 145) – LEADERSHIP, POLICY, AND CHANGE

Monday 3:05 – 5:35 pm, Rubenstein Hall 149

Instructor: Alma Blount

This is a course about leadership for public life. It is about the art of facilitating policy discussions that lead to political engagement and collective action. By working in groups, we will track current events, analyze stories in greater depth by reading nonfiction books and journal articles, facilitate workshops with peers to practice how to frame issues, and design a public forum. We will begin the semester investigating a topic chosen by the instructor. (Topic to be announced). Then, by following several important, complicated and contested issues that we hear about each day in the news, we will choose additional topics to explore together as a class.

The goals of this course are first, to help you learn how to take a deep dive into recurring news stories in order to understand the systemic complexities and contexts beneath the headlines. Second, we want you to strategize about to how bring your ideas to larger audiences for discussion and debate, and to reflect on what you learn during the process. [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Inquiries/Competencies: EI]

PPS89S.01 (PPS49) – NARRATIVE AND LEADERSHIP

Tuesday/Thursday 11:45 - 1:00 pm, Sanford 150

Instructor: Frederick Mayer

This course explores the role of stories and storytelling in public leadership. It will consider the ways in which stories operate in mind and culture, forming beliefs and attitudes, constructing identity, and motivating behavior. Through examples drawn from social movements, political campaigns, presidential leadership, community initiatives, and sports, students will learn how stories motivate leaders and move communities, and develop storytelling as a leadership skill. [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Inquiries/Competencies: EI, First Year Students Only PERMISSION REQUIRED

PPS 232: The Insurgent South

Instructor: Robert Korstad

Topic: Social Movements in the South
Community Partners: Church World Service, Southern Coalition for Social Justice
RSL Students: 11

PPS 301: The Politics of Public Policy

Instructor: Nick Carnes

Topic: Political Engagement
Community Partners: John Locke Foundation (Raleigh), Southern Coalition for Social Justice
RSL Students: 15

PPS301.01– POLITICAL ANALYSIS FOR PUBLIC POLICY-MAKING

Tuesday/Thursday 10:05 - 11:20 am, Sanford 05

Instructor: Kristin A. Goss

This course will teach you the tools of political analysis through the lens of public policy. Like other public policy courses, this one will teach you both generalizable concepts and practical skills. These skills include how to identify key actors and understand their resources and motives; how to explain political processes and outcomes; and how to maneuver strategically within constraints and opportunities to address public problems. Prerequisite: Public Policy 155D. [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Inquiries/Competencies: W]

History 470S.01 – Leadership in American History

Tuesday/Thursday 4:40 - 5:55 pm, Carr 242

Instructor: Gerald Wilson

The seminar will focus on political, social, business, and artistic leaders in American history and problems which have called for leadership. In addition to selected short reading, students will examine closely the following: James MacGregor Burns’ "Leadership"; Walter Clark’s "Ox Bow Incident"; Niccolo Machiavelli’s "The Prince"; May and R. Neustadt’s "Thinking in Time"; Robert Penn Warren’s "All the King's Men"; Gary Wills’ "Certain Trumpets"; and David Gergen’s "Eyewitness to Power." [Areas of Knowledge: CZ; Inquiries/Competencies: EI, R] Permission Required

History 130D.001 – AMERICAN DREAMS/AMERICAN REALITIES

Monday/Wednesday 11:45 - 12:35 pm, 116 Old Chem

Instructor: Gerald Wilson

What does it mean to be an “American?” A French political scientist said, “To be a Frenchman is a fact; to be an American is an ideal.” What commonly shared ideals, ideas, “myths” define us as “Americans?” This course examines the role of some commonly shared myths as “rags to riches,” the “agrarian way of life,” the “frontier”, the “foreign devil” and the “City on a Hill” in defining the American character and determining our hopes, fears, dreams and actions through our history.

Attention will be given to the surface consistency of these myths as accepted by each immigrant group versus the shifting content of the myths as they change to reflect the hopes and values of each of these groups. [Areas of Knowledge: CZ; Inquiries/Competencies: CCI]

PPS 590S.08 – THE REPUBLICAN PARTY AND ITS FUTURE

Tuesday/Thursday 1:25 - 2:40 pm, Sanford 150

Instructor: Marty Morris

For 35 years Marty Morris worked in Republican politics, as a statew ide campaign manager, consultant to a presidential campaign, and Chief of Staff for Senator Dick Lugar. In this course, students will look at the evolution of the party of Lincoln and investigate the forces that now make up the Republican Party. Students will explore where they stand, as citizens and as possible future office holders, on many of the complex issues facing the GOP today.

Students will be introduced to useful tools of the political trade. They will look at policy theories that have worked in the past and might work again in the future. The class will attempt to answer the central question that many commentators have put forth –is the Republican Party becoming a permanent minority party, or can it rise again as the authentic, practical voice of American conservatism? [Areas of Knowledge: SS]

PPS 415.01 – ADAPTIVE LEADERSHIP

Wednesday 4:40 - 7:10 pm, Sanford 150

Instructor: Alma Blount

Capstone seminar for students completing community-based research (CBR) projects through the Service Opportunities in Leadership program. Involves critical reflection on summer projects, exploration of leadership, politics, and policy design concepts. With students' experiences, questions, and insights as a starting point, this course explores how lives of commitment to the common good are formed and sustained. [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Inquiries/Competencies: EI, W, R] PERMISSION REQUIRED

PPS290.05 – NARRATIVE AND LEADERSHIP

Tuesday/Thursday 11:45 - 1:00 pm, Sanford 150

Instructor: Frederick Mayer

This course explores the role of stories and storytelling in public leadership. It will consider the ways in which stories operate in mind and culture, forming beliefs and attitudes, constructing identity, and motivating behavior. Through examples drawn from social movements, political campaigns, presidential leadership, community initiatives, and sports, students will learn how stories motivate leaders and move communities, and develop storytelling as a leadership skill. [Areas of Knowledge: SS, CCI; Inquiries/Competencies: EI] PERMISSION REQUIRED

PPS 265.01 – ENTERPRISING LEADERSHIP

Wednesday/Friday 1:25 –2:40 pm, RH 153

Instructor: Tony Brown

This course is designed to provide an engaging and stimulating climate for students to explore leadership, leadership development and the other themes of the course. The core pedagogy of the course focuses on experiential learning activities, including a personal leadership plan, a team-based community leadership project, case discussions, readings, guest speakers, and personal reflection.

Class topics include the meaning of leadership, leadership development, personal character and values, worldviews and citizenship, leadership attributes and behaviors, organizational change, strategy and planning, conflict resolution, and decision-making and judgment. MARKETS AND MANAGEMENT CERTIFICATE – CORE COURSE, SERVICE-LEARNING COURSE [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Inquiries/Competencies: EI]

PPS260.01 – LEADERSHIP, POLICY, AND CHANGE

Monday/Wednesday 3:05 – 4:20 pm, Rubenstein 149

Instructor: Steve Schewel

This is a course about leadership for public life. Together we will tackle the pressing strategic and ethical issues related to a significant challenge facing our democracy today—the tension between the demands of national security and the necessity for democratic oversight, between the need for secrecy and the rights of citizens.

Today this conflict plays itself out in news headlines about drone strikes, cyber-attacks and covert intelligence missions, and it captures the nation’s imagination in Oscar-winning films like Argo and Zero Dark Thirty. This gives us the opportunity to view the issue through the lens of current events and popular culture. At the same time, the tension between secret national security actions and democratic rights and practices is as old as the republic itself, so we will read widely in the history of national security secrecy to give context to current events. As we read about drones and spies and cyber “worms,” we will examine the values conflicts that are central to the debate about national security secrecy in a democracy. Our exploration will challenge us to take stock of our responsibilities as citizens, and to look for opportunities to exercise leadership on the issue. In this course you will begin to practice leadership skills such as learning how to raise difficult public questions, to go beyond your own authority to push for change, to be self-reflective in the midst of action, to find allies and partners, to manage conflict, to provide a vision of a possible future, and to involve your community in the difficult work of political engagement and collective action. [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Inquiries/Competencies: EI]

PPS 190FS.03 – LEADERSHIP & CIVIC ENGAGEMENT (Focus Program Students Only)

Wednesday/Friday 10:05 – 11:20 am, Sanford 150

Instructor: Tony Brown

The course explores ways that students can exercise innovative, resourceful leadership to address important civic issues with and external to Duke University. The course will investigate the fundamental civic issues of citizenship, community, equity and wellness while addressing underlying questions about individual and group empathy, integrity, and agency.

Students will write a personal civic engagement leadership plan and a number of short papers. Student teams will develop practical initiatives that address an important civic issue at Duke based on an experiential pedagogy of “action-based, integrated learning experiences,” in which student teams apply classroom theory and experiences in a project that addresses a real issue and produces real results during the semester. A successful project requires the development and application of knowledge (theory and situation specific), thorough analysis, and good judgment. Success also requires highly-engaged students. The most engaged students are likely to have a keen interest in civic engagement and value action-based, integrated learning experiences. [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Inquiries/Competencies: EI] /SERVICE LEARNING COURSE/ PERMISSION REQUIRED

PPS 301: The Politics of Public Policy

Instructor: Kristin A. Goss

Topic: Immigration Reform
Community Partners: Enlaces, Church World Service
RSL Students: 9

PPS 415.01 – ADAPTIVE LEADERSHIP

Wednesday 4:40 - 7:10 pm, Sanford 150

Instructor: Alma Blount

Capstone seminar for students completing community-based research (CBR) projects through the Service Opportunities in Leadership program. Involves critical reflection on summer projects, exploration of leadership, politics, and policy design concepts. With students' experiences, questions, and insights as a starting point, this course explores how lives of commitment to the common good are formed and sustained. [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Inquiries/Competencies: EI, W, R] PERMISSION REQUIRED

PPS301.01 – POLITICAL ANALYSIS FOR PUBLIC POLICY-MAKING

Monday /Wednesday 1:25 - 2:40 pm, Sanford 04

Instructors: Ken Rogerson, Nick Carnes

This course examines the analysis of the political and organizational processes which influence the formulation and implementation of public policy. Prerequisite: Public Policy 155D. [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Inquiries/Competencies: W]

PPS 242S.01 – CHILD POLICY RESEARCH

Tuesday/Thursday 10:05 - 11:20 am, Gross Hall 105

Instructor: Clara Muschkin

This course takes an interdisciplinary approach to examining the issues facing today’s youth, from childhood through adolescence. Students will begin by exploring the forces that shape the definition of childhood across place and time, and review how different social science disciplines study childhood.

They will then consider the many social contexts of childhood, including the family, schools, the economy, race, and gender. One of the objectives of this course is to gain an understanding of issues of childhood adversity—including poverty, abuse and violence, deviance and delinquency, and health inequities—and some of the public policies that address these issues. [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Inquiries/Competencies: W]

History 470S – LEADERSHIP IN AMERICAN HISTORY

Tuesday/Thursday 4:40 - 5:55 pm, Soc Sci 105

Instructor: Gerald Wilson

The seminar will focus on political, social, business, and artistic leaders in American history and problems which have called for leadership. In addition to selected short reading, students will examine closely the following: James MacGregor Burns’ "Leadership"; Walter Clark’s "Ox Bow Incident"; Niccolo Machiavelli’s "The Prince"; May and R. Neustadt’s "Thinking in Time"; Robert Penn Warren’s "All the King's Men"; Gary Wills’ "Certain Trumpets"; and David Gergen’s "Eyewitness to Power." [Areas of Knowledge: SS, Inquiries/Competencies: EI, R] PERMISSION REQUIRED

History 130D – AMERICAN DREAMS/AMERICAN REALITIES

Monday /Wednesday 11:45 - 12:35 pm, Soc Sci 136

Instructor: Gerald Wilson

This seminar will examine the role of such myths as "rags to riches," "beacon to the world," the "frontier" and the "foreign devil" in defining the American character and determining the hopes, fears, dreams and actions of people throughout American History. Also, attention is given to the surface consistency of these myths as accepted by each immigrant group versus the shifting content of the myths as they change to reflect the hopes and values of each of these groups. [Areas of Knowledge: CZ; Inquiries/Competencies: R]

PPS 590S.08 – THE REPUBLICAN PARTY AND ITS FUTURE

Tuesday/Thursday 11:45 - 1:00 pm, Sanford 150

Instructor: Marty Morris

For 35 years Marty Morris worked in Republican politics, as a statewide campaign manager, consultant to a presidential campaign, and Chief of Staff for Senator Dick Lugar. In this course, students will look at the evolution of the party of Lincoln and investigate the forces that now make up the Republican Party. Students will explore where they stand, as citizens and as possible future office holders, on many of the complex issues facing the GOP today. Students will be introduced to useful tools of the political trade. They will look at policy theories that have worked in the past and might work again in the future. The class will attempt to answer the central question that many commentators have put forth –is the Republican Party becoming a permanent minority party, or can it rise again as the authentic, practical voice of American conservatism? [Areas of Knowledge: SS]

PPS 270.01 – CIVIC PARTICIPATION/COMMUNITY LEADERSHIP

Monday/Wednesday 11:45 - 1:00 pm, Sanford 150

Instructor: Steve Schewel

For global societies to prosper over the next fifty years, our cities must succeed. This success, if it comes, will be hard won. From New York to Mumbai to Durham, our cities are challenged by the sharp divisions of race, language and ethnicity; by the influx of new immigrants; by aging infrastructure, lack of decent housing, environmental degradation, drugs, crime and poverty.

At the same time, city dwellers around the world are consciously nourishing their own urban revival. Here in the United States, we see everywhere the reclamation of abandoned downtowns, the retrofitting of brick factories into offices and shops, the explosion of high-end restaurants and an obsessive food culture, new theaters and stadiums in the middle of downtown. So the questions arise: Who will share in this urban revival? Is it reserved only for a prosperous metropolitan elite? Or can the rebirth of cities include alliances across the lines of race, class, ethnicity and culture to attack our most intransigent social problems together? Enrollment for this class is limited, so the class will be taught in the seminar style. Seated around the seminar table, we will learn together, and your participation and ideas will be crucial to the success of our class. Our reading and discussion will involve us in a critical examination of the pressing strategic and ethical issues we face if our cities are to survive and prosper. Along the way, each of you will focus on your own role as a potential civic participant and community leader in our common effort to make our cities work. [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Inquiries/Competencies: EI]

PPS263.01 – BORDER CROSSING: LEADERSHIP, VALUE CONFLICTS & PUBLIC LIFE

Tuesday/Thursday 10:05 - 11:20 am; Wednesday 10:20 - 11:10 am - Rubenstein Hall 149

Instructor: Alma Blount

This is the preparation course for students who plan to conduct community-based research in the summer through Service Opportunities in Leadership (SOL) or another research service-learning opportunity. We have designed this course to provide you with theoretical knowledge and critical reflection skills for entering other cultures to work with community organizations.

You will receive training in basic research methods, and conduct a service project for a community partner organization. You will also be introduced to a leadership framework for analyzing complex problem solving work that requires wading into controversy—and learning to work with it productively—in order mobilize groups, institutions and systems to do difficult work. Class final essay Class reflections by a student

PPS260.01 – LEADERSHIP, POLICY, AND CHANGE

Monday /Wednesday 1:25 - 2:40 pm, Sanford 102

Instructor: Alma Blount

This is a course about leadership for public life. It is about the art of facilitating policy discussions that generate interest among your peers, and call for political engagement. Each year the course focuses on a policy topic in the news. This spring our topic is FOOD POLITICS, and we will explore a series of policy questions concerning the locavore/sustainable food movement in North Carolina and across the U.S.

Working in groups, you will learn to: #1) track news stories and then dive beneath the headlines in order to understand systemic complexities and contexts; #2) strategize about to how exercise leadership effectively by bringing your policy ideas to larger audiences for discussion and debate, and #3) reflect on what you learn during the process. You will develop skills such as:

  • Developing a rich understanding of topics by exploring multiple viewpoints
  • Cutting through complexity without dumbing it down
  • Understanding leadership challenges/opportunities
  • Engaging your peers in conversations that generate new ideas
We will also investigate concepts of leadership and authority, democratic participation, group decision-making, and public deliberation. Your charge will be to design a forum in such a way that it engages a diverse group of people in a hard-nosed discussion that points toward practical policy options. This course involves intensive group learning. We will start with an initial list of readings, but we will also be building the course together throughout the semester. Your active engagement in the assignments, discussions, projects and forum activities will provide valuable opportunities for you to discover your own potential for exercising leadership for public life. [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Inquiries/Competencies: EI]

PPS 259S.01 – WOMEN AS LEADERS

Tuesday 3:05 - 5:35 pm, Sanford 225

Instructor: Katie Hood

The title of this course is so obvious, and yet it is not. This is a class about women and leadership, but what does that mean? We will explore a dynamic framework for analyzing leadership where leading is not restricted to “born leaders,” but is seen as an amalgam of accessible elements that include one’s situation, sense of purpose, orientation to results, authenticity, courage and self-awareness.

We will discuss women as leaders in society—primarily in the United States, but also in international contexts. Although women have made broad strides, there is still subtle—and sometimes not so subtle—evidence that barriers continue for women in leadership roles. We will ask the question – thirty years after women became the majority of college graduates in the U.S., why are only 3% of Fortune 500 CEO’s women? And while women have made great progress in developing public personas and attaining elected office, why are so few of our senior officeholders women? We will explore root causes for these leadership roadblocks, not to complain, but to move past and generate ideas for solutions. Throughout the course, we will investigate individual stories of women leaders to more deeply understand leadership theory in action and gender differences in leadership. We will read case studies and biographies, view documentaries, and engage women leaders in frank conversation as we work to refine our insights about these complex issues. [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Inquiries/Competencies: W]

PPS 242: Children in Contemporary Society

Instructor: Clara Muschkin

RSL Topic: Education in Action
Community Partner: The Salvation Army Boys and Girls Club
Number of RSL Students: 6

PPS 301: The Politics of Public Policy

Instructors: Ken Rogerson, Nick Carnes

RSL Topic: Political Engagement 2
Community Partners: John Locke Foundation (Raleigh), North Carolina Voters for Clean Elections
Number of RSL Students: 14

PPS 301.01 – POLITICAL ANAYLSIS FOR PUBLIC POLICY-MAKING

Tuesday/Thursday 10:05 – 11:20 am, Sanford 05

Instructor: Kristin A. Goss

This course will teach you the tools of political analysis through the lens of public policy. Like other public policy courses, this one will teach you both generalizable concepts and practical skills. These skills include how to identify key actors and understand their resources and motives; how to explain political processes and outcomes; and how to maneuver strategically within constraints and opportunities to address public problems. Prerequisite: Public Policy 155D. [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Inquiries/Competencies: W]

HST 470S.01 – LEADERSHIP IN AMERICAN HISTORY

Tuesday/Thursday 4:40 - 5:55 pm, Soc Psy 128

Instructor: Gerald Wilson

The seminar will focus on political, social, business, and artistic leaders in American history and problems which have called for leadership. In addition to selected short readings, students will examine closely the following: James MacGregor Burns’ "Leadership"; Walter Clark’s "Ox Bow Incident"; Niccolo Machiavelli’s "The Prince"; May and R. Neustadt’s "Thinking in Time"; Robert Penn Warren’s "All the King's Men"; Gary Wills’ "Certain Trumpets"; and David Gergen’s "Eyewitness to Power." [Areas of Knowledge: CZ; Inquiries/Competencies: EI, R] Permission Required

HST 130D.001 – AMERICAN DREAMS/AMERICAN REALITIES

Monday/Wednesday 11:45 - 12:35 pm, Social Science 136

Instructor: Gerald Wilson

What does it mean to be an “American?” A French political scientist said, “To be a Frenchman is a fact; to be an American is an ideal.” What commonly shared ideals, ideas, “myths” define us as “Americans?” This course examines the role of some commonly shared myths as “rags to riches,” the “agrarian way of life,” the “frontier”, the “foreign devil” and the “City on a Hill” in defining the American character and determining our hopes, fears, dreams and actions through our history.

Attention will be given to the surface consistency of these myths as accepted by each immigrant group versus the shifting content of the myths as they change to reflect the hopes and values of each of these groups. [Areas of Knowledge: CZ; Inquiries/Competencies: CCI]

PPS 590S.08 – THE REPUBLICAN PARTY AND ITS FUTURE

Tuesday/Thursday 1:25 - 2:40 pm, Sanford 150

Instructor: Marty Morris

For 35 years Marty Morris worked in Republican politics, as a statewide campaign manager, consultant to a presidential campaign, and Chief of Staff for Senator Dick Lugar. In this course, students will look at the evolution of the party of Lincoln and investigate the forces that now make up the Republican Party. Students will explore where they stand, as citizens and as possible future office holders, on many of the complex issues facing the GOP today. Students will be introduced to useful tools of the political trade.

They will look at policy theories that have worked in the past and might work again in the future. The class will attempt to answer the central question that many commentators have put forth –is the Republican Party becoming a permanent minority party, or can it rise again as the authentic, practical voice of American conservatism? [Areas of Knowledge: SS]

PPS271.S.01 – SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP IN ACTION

Wednesday/Friday 1:25 – 2:40, Sanford 150

Instructor: Tony Brown

Social Entrepreneurship in Action is a leadership course in applied social innovation. The central goal of the course is to provide students with an academic opportunity to leverage their experiences and interests to create social innovation initiatives. More than a traditional social entrepreneurship education course, the course design is based on the principle that significant learning and development are results of creating projects that will actually benefit others.

The course integrates theory and practice (more practice to theory than vice-versa) in providing students with knowledge, analytical competence, and leadership skills important to exercising social entrepreneurship. Teams of students will develop a promising idea, followed sequentially by a credible proposal and a compelling plan. Following the end of the course, many students will pilot-test and subsequently launch projects that become signature accomplishments. MARKETS AND MANAGEMENT CERTIFICATE – CORE COURSE, SERVICE-LEARNING COURSE [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Inquiries/Competencies: EI] Permission Required

PPS 265.01 – ENTERPRISING LEADERSHIP

Tuesday/Thursday 1:25 –2:40 pm, Rubenstein 151

This course is designed to provide an engaging and stimulating climate for students to explore leadership, leadership development and the other themes of the course. The core pedagogy of the course focuses on experiential learning activities, including a personal leadership plan, a team-based leadership project, case discussions, readings, guest speakers, and personal reflection.

Class topics include the meaning of leadership, leadership development, personal character and values, worldviews and citizenship, leadership attributes and behaviors, organizational change, strategy and planning, conflict resolution, and decision-making and judgment. MARKETS AND MANAGEMENT CERTIFICATE – CORE COURSE, SERVICE-LEARNING COURSE [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Inquiries/Competencies: EI]

PPS260.01 – LEADERSHIP, POLICY, AND CHANGE

Monday/Wednesday 11:45 – 1:00 pm, Location - Sanford 224

Instructor: Steve Schewel

This is a course about leading political change. Together we will tackle two critical and intimately related aspects of this leadership. First, we will examine the challenge of making courageous moral choices in the public realm. Then we will study the crucial role of social movements in creating change.

Throughout, we will ask these questions: How can we ourselves best contribute to the great social movements of our time? How can we ourselves help lead political change? To answer these questions, we will first consider the moral choices of well-known historical figures, of ordinary people in history, and characters in fiction and film. We’ll study the psychology of obedience, acquiescence and resistance, and we’ll inspect the conscience and actions of public dissenters from abolitionist John Brown to recent NSA whistle-blowers. Then we will turn our attention to the role of social movements in making political change. We’ll examine the role of elites—from Theodore Roosevelt to muckraking journalists—in the leadership of the progressive movement. We’ll view Martin Luther King close up—and the people who funded, fought and followed him. We’ll explore the meteoric rise of the modern Tea Party. Through the lens of this history, we will take stock of our own potential to lead change from positions of authority or from the grassroots. We will learn how to raise difficult public questions, to go beyond our own authority to push for change, to be self-reflective in the midst of action, to find partners and build alliances, to manage value conflicts, to provide a vision of a possible future, and to involve our communities in the difficult work of political engagement and collective action. [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Inquiries/Competencies: EI]

PPS 190FS.03 – LEADERSHIP & CIVIC ENGAGEMENT (Focus Program Students Only)

Wednesday/Friday 10:05 – 11:20 am, Sanford 150

Instructor: Tony Brown

The course explores ways that students can exercise innovative, resourceful leadership to address important civic issues within and beyond to Duke University. The course will investigate the fundamental civic issues of citizenship, community, equity and wellness while addressing underlying questions about individual and group empathy, integrity, and agency.

Students will write a personal civic engagement leadership plan and a number of short papers. Student teams will develop practical initiatives that address an important civic issue at Duke based on an experiential pedagogy of “action-based, integrated learning experiences,” in which student teams apply classroom theory and experiences in a project that addresses a real issue and produces real results during the semester. A successful project requires the development and application of knowledge (theory and situation specific), thorough analysis, and good judgment. Success also requires highly-engaged students. The most engaged students are likely to have a keen interest in civic engagement and value action-based, integrated learning experiences. [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Inquiries/Competencies: EI] /SERVICE LEARNING COURSE/ PERMISSION REQUIRED

PPS 301: The Politics of Public Policy

Instructor: Kristin A. Goss

RSL Topic: Social Engagement in Durham
Community Partners: Church World Service, Democracy North Carolina
Number of RSL Students: 7

PPS 242: Children in Contemporary Society

Instructor: Clara Muschkin

Topic: Education in Action
Community Partners: The Salvation Army Boys and Girls Club
RSL Students: 7

PUBPOL 263: Border Crossing: Leadership, Value Conflicts and Public Life

Tuesday/Thursday 10:05-11:20; 149 Rubenstein Hall; Wednesday 10:20-11:10; 200 Rubenstein Hall

Instructor: Alma Blount

This is the preparation course for students who plan to conduct community-based research in the summer through Service Opportunities in Leadership (SOL) or another research service-learning opportunity. We have designed this course to provide you with theoretical knowledge and critical reflection skills for entering other cultures to work with community organizations.

You will receive training in basic research methods, and conduct a service project for a community partner organization. You will also be introduced to a leadership framework for analyzing complex problem solving work that requires wading into controversy—and learning to work with it productively—in order mobilize groups, institutions and systems to do difficult work. Class final essay Class reflections by a student

PPS 271s: Social Entrepreneurship in Action

Instructor: Tony Brown

Teams of students define a promising idea and develop a compelling plan that addresses a real problem or opportunity in the Duke or Durham communities, with the objectives of creating meaningful learning experiences for themselves and something of enduring value for the community. This course is by permission only. To obtain a permission number, please set up an interview with ELI Program Director Tony Brown at anthony.brown@duke.edu.

PPS 265.01: - Enterprising Leadership

Instructor: Tony Brown

Provides students with relevant insights, knowledge, analytical competence, and skills important to exercising ethical, enterprising leadership in organizations and informal groups.

PPS 242S.01 – CHILD POLICY RESEARCH

Tuesday/Thursday 11:45 - 1:00 pm, Sanford 150

Instructor: Clara Muschkin

This course takes an interdisciplinary approach to examining the issues facing today’s youth, from childhood through adolescence. Students will begin by exploring the forces that shape the definition of childhood across place and time, and review how different social science disciplines study childhood.

They will then consider the many social contexts of childhood, including the family, schools, the economy, race, and gender. One of the objectives of this course is to gain an understanding of issues of childhood adversity—including poverty, abuse and violence, deviance and delinquency, and health inequities—and some of the public policies that address these issues. [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Inquiries/Competencies: W]

History 470S – LEADERSHIP IN AMERICAN HISTORY

Tuesday/Thursday 4:40 - 5:55 pm, Social Psy 128

Instructor: Gerald Wilson

The seminar will focus on political, social, business, and artistic leaders in American history and problems which have called for leadership. In addition to selected short reading, students will examine closely the following: James MacGregor Burns’ "Leadership"; Walter Clark’s "Ox Bow Incident"; Niccolo Machiavelli’s "The Prince"; May and R. Neustadt’s "Thinking in Time"; Robert Penn Warren’s "All the King's Men"; Gary Wills’ "Certain Trumpets"; and David Gergen’s "Eyewitness to Power." [Areas of Knowledge: SS, Inquiries/Competencies: EI, R] PERMISSION REQUIRED

History 130D – AMERICAN DREAMS/AMERICAN REALITIES

Monday /Wednesday 11:45 - 12:35 pm, Social Sciences 136

Instructor: Gerald Wilson

This seminar will examine the role of such myths as "rags to riches," "beacon to the world," the "frontier" and the "foreign devil" in defining the American character and determining the hopes, fears, dreams and actions of people throughout American History.

Also, attention is given to the surface consistency of these myths as accepted by each immigrant group versus the shifting content of the myths as they change to reflect the hopes and values of each of these groups. [Areas of Knowledge: CZ; Inquiries/Competencies: R]

PPS590S.01 – PUBLIC LEADERSHIP

Tuesday 6:15 - 8:45 pm, Allen 226

This course is designed for students seeking a foundation in the theory and practice of effective public leadership. We will explore contemporary public leadership through case studies, analysis of the current political environment, class discussions with a variety of public leaders and a semester long leadership project focused on creating a local solution to a national public problem. [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Inquiries/Competencies: R]

PPS 290.03 – AMERICAN POLITICS: PASSION AND LEADERSHIP

Tuesday/Thursday 10:05 - 11:20 am, Sanford 150

Students will be exposed to the institutions, influences and competing agendas that have shaped American political leadership. Guest speakers will include elected and appointed officials, media personalities’ and others acting on their passion, attempting to exercise leadership and effect change. Students will research a case of political leadership in depth, conducting primary research and employing leadership theory. [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Inquiries/Competencies: R]

PPS 270.01 – CIVIC PARTICIPATION/COMMUNITY LEADERSHIP

Monday/Wednesday 11:45 - 1:00 pm, Sanford 224

Instructor: Steve Schewel

For global societies to prosper over the next fifty years, our cities must succeed. This success, if it comes, will be hard won. From New York to Mumbai to Durham, our cities are challenged by the sharp divisions of race, language and ethnicity; by the influx of new immigrants; by aging infrastructure, lack of decent housing, environmental degradation, drugs, crime and poverty.

At the same time, city dwellers around the world are consciously nourishing their own urban revival. Here in the United States, we see everywhere the reclamation of abandoned downtowns, the retrofitting of brick factories into offices and shops, the explosion of high-end restaurants and an obsessive food culture, new theaters and stadiums in the middle of downtown. So the questions arise: Who will share in this urban revival? Is it reserved only for prosperous metropolitan elite? Or can the rebirth of cities include alliances across the lines of race, class, ethnicity and culture to attack our most intransigent social problems together? Enrollment for this class is limited, so the class will be taught in the seminar style. Seated around the seminar table, we will learn together, and your participation and ideas will be crucial to the success of our class. Our reading and discussion will involve us in a critical examination of the pressing strategic and ethical issues we face if our cities are to survive and prosper. Along the way, each of you will focus on your own role as a potential civic participant and community leader in our common effort to make our cities work. [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Inquiries/Competencies: EI]

PPS263.01 – BORDER CROSSING: LEADERSHIP, VALUE CONFLICTS & PUBLIC LIFE

Tuesday/Thursday 10:05 - 11:20 am; Wednesday 10:20 - 11:10 am, Rubenstein 200

Instructor: Alma Blount

This is the preparation course for students who plan to conduct community-based research projects in the summer through Service Opportunities in Leadership, or another research service-learning opportunity. Through case studies about complex, difficult policy issues in our society, this course explores leadership as the art of working productively with value conflicts in groups, institutions, and social systems.

The course includes training in basic research methods and ethics of human subject research, completion of a 20-hour service project for a community organization, and exploration of a leadership framework for undertaking complex problem-solving work in the public arena. [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Inquiries/Competencies: EI, R, W] PERMISSION REQUIRED

PPS260.01 – LEADERSHIP, POLICY, AND CHANGE

Monday /Wednesday 1:25 - 2:40 pm, Sanford 150

Instructor: Alma Blount

This is a course about leadership for public life. It is about learning to facilitate robust discussions with your peers about complex, seemingly intractable policy problems. This spring our topic is the cultural politics of climate change.

What some people call the “long emergency,” climate change presents us with an unparalleled set of interdependent challenges. We can track a daily litany of sobering stories in the daily news, and we can read scores of excellent books and articles by experts that warn of climate catastrophe and exhort us to take decisive action. Yet our political institutions, for the most part, seem paralyzed. As we learn more about the issue, the enormity of it can feel overwhelming. If climate change is the most important environmental challenge we face, what can we do individually and collectively to make a difference? How should we realistically assess our prospects for adaptation and mitigation? Even when it is difficult to believe that our own actions matter, is it possible to channel our concerns into effective political action and policy change? In this course you will develop skills such as:

  • developing a rich understanding of policy topics by exploring multiple viewpoints
  • cutting through complexity without dumbing it down
  • understanding leadership challenges and opportunities
  • engaging your peers in conversations that generate new ideas
Working in groups, you will learn to: 1) follow news stories and then dive beneath the headlines to explore systemic complexities and contexts; 2) strategize about how to bring your ideas to larger audiences for discussion and debate, and 3) reflect on what you learn throughout the process. Your active engagement in the weekly assignments and discussions will provide valuable opportunities for you to discover your own potential for exercising leadership for public life. [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Inquiries/Competencies: EI]

PPS 301: The Politics of Public Policy

Instructor: Kristin A. Goss

RSL Topic: Political Engagement in the Triangle
Community Partners: Church World Service, Durham Literacy Center, John Locke Foundation and the Religious Coalition for a Nonviolent Durham
RSL Students: 15

PPS 415.01 – ADAPTIVE LEADERSHIP

Wednesday 4:40 - 7:10 pm, Sanford 150

Instructor: Alma Blount

Capstone seminar for students completing community-based research (CBR) projects through the Service Opportunities in Leadership program. Involves critical reflection on summer projects, exploration of leadership, politics, and policy design concepts. With students' experiences, questions, and insights as a starting point, this course explores how lives of commitment to the common good are formed and sustained. [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Inquiries/Competencies: EI, W, R] PERMISSION REQUIRED

PPS271.S.01 – SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP IN ACTION

Tuesday/Thursday 3:05 –4:20 pm, Sanford 102

Instructor: Tony Brown

Social Entrepreneurship in Action is a leadership course in applied social innovation. The central goal of the course is to provide students with an academic opportunity to leverage their experiences and interests to create social innovation initiatives. More than a traditional social entrepreneurship education course, the course design is based on the principle that significant learning and development are results of creating projects that will actually benefit others.

The course integrates theory and practice (more practice to theory than vice-versa) in providing students with knowledge, analytical competence, and leadership skills important to exercising social entrepreneurship. Teams of students will develop a promising idea, followed sequentially by a credible proposal and a compelling plan. Following the end of the course, many students will pilot-test and subsequently launch projects that become signature accomplishments. MARKETS AND MANAGEMENT CERTIFICATE – CORE COURSE, SERVICE-LEARNING COURSE [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Inquiries/Competencies: EI] PERMISSION REQUIRED: Open to sophomores (and juniors on an exception basis)

PPS 265.01 – ENTERPRISING LEADERSHIP

Tuesday/Thursday 1:25 –2:40 pm, Rubenstein 149

Instructor: Tony Brown

This course is designed to provide students with knowledge, analytical competence, and skills important to exercising enterprising leadership in college and as young professionals. The course explores the many facets of leadership and leadership development including the processes by which people effect change in a variety of roles and situations.

Not a traditional course in leadership studies or organizational management, the central foci include analysis tools, self-knowledge, results-oriented team projects, and a class learning community. The experiential course design and interactive teaching method require highly engaged students who value contributing to a robust learning community. MARKETS AND MANAGEMENT CERTIFICATE – CORE COURSE, SERVICE-LEARNING COURSE [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Inquiries/Competencies: EI] PERMISION REQUIRED: Open to juniors and seniors.

PPS260.01 – LEADERSHIP, POLICY, AND CHANGE

Monday/Wednesday 11:45 – 1:00 pm, Sanford 224

Instructor: Steve Schewel

This is a course about leading political change. Together we will tackle two critical and intimately related aspects of this leadership. First, we will examine the challenge of making courageous moral choices in the public realm. Then we will study the crucial role of social movements in creating change.

Throughout, we will ask these questions: How can we ourselves best contribute to the great social movements of our time? How can we ourselves help lead political change? To answer these questions, we will first consider the moral choices of well-known historical figures, of ordinary people in history, and characters in fiction and film. We’ll study the psychology of obedience, acquiescence and resistance, and we’ll inspect the conscience and actions of public dissenters from abolitionist John Brown to NSA whistle-blowers. Then we will turn our attention to the role of social movements in making political change. We’ll examine the creators of the American Revolution, from grassroots leaders like Sam Adams to elites like George Washington. We’ll follow the young people who led the Civil Rights Movement. We’ll see the Second Wave of the Women’s Movement close up. We’ll explore the meteoric rise of the modern Tea Party. Through the lens of this history, we will take stock of our own potential to lead political change from positions of authority or from the grassroots. We will learn how to raise difficult public questions, to go beyond our own authority to push for change, to be self-reflective in the midst of action, to find partners and build alliances, to manage value conflicts, to provide a vision of a possible future, and to involve our communities in the difficult work of political engagement and collective action. [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Inquiries/Competencies: EI]

History 470S.01 – LEADERSHIP IN AMERICAN HISTORY

Tuesday/Thursday 4:40 - 5:55 pm, Social Psy 228

Instructor: Gerald Wilson

The seminar will focus on political, social, business, and artistic leaders in American history and problems which have called for leadership. In addition to selected short readings, students will examine closely the following: James MacGregor Burns’ "Leadership"; Walter Clark’s "Ox Bow Incident"; Niccolo Machiavelli’s "The Prince"; May and R. Neustadt’s "Thinking in Time"; Robert Penn Warren’s "All the King's Men"; Gary Wills’ "Certain Trumpets"; and David Gergen’s "Eyewitness to Power." [Areas of Knowledge: CZ; Inquiries/Competencies: EI, R] PERMISSION REQUIRED

History 130D.001 – AMERICAN DREAMS/AMERICAN REALITIES

Monday/Wednesday 11:45 - 12:35 pm, Social Science 136

Instructor: Gerald Wilson

What does it mean to be an “American?” A French political scientist said, “To be a Frenchman is a fact; to be an American is an ideal.” What commonly shared ideals, ideas, “myths” define us as “Americans?” This course examines the role of some commonly shared myths as “rags to riches,” the “agrarian way of life,” the “frontier,” the “foreign devils” and the “City on a Hill” in defining the American character and determining our hopes, fears, dreams and actions through our history.

Attention will be given to the surface consistency of these myths as accepted by each immigrant group versus the shifting content of the myths as they change to reflect the hopes and values of each of these groups. [Areas of Knowledge: CZ; Inquiries/Competencies: CCI]

PPS 301: The Politics of Public Policy

Instructor: Deondra Rose

RSL Topic: Political Advocacy in the Triangle
Community Partners: Democracy North Carolina, John Locke Foundation, People's Alliance
RSL Students: 12

PPS 301: The Politics of Public Policy

Instructor: Ken Rogerson

RSL Topic: Poverty in Durham
Community Partners: Durham Literacy Center, Food Bank of Central and Eastern North Carolina, Meals on Wheels of North Carolina
RSL Students: 12

PPS 270.01 – POLITICAL PARTICIPATION & LEADERSHIP

Monday/Wednesday 1:25 - 2:40 pm, Sanford 150

Instructors: Alma Blount, Steve Schewel

This is the gateway course for the Political Engagement Pilot Project (PEPP), a collaboration between the Hart Leadership Program and POLIS: the Center on Politics, Leadership, Innovation and Service. PEPP will include three steps: this spring seminar on politics, policy and leadership, a summer internship grant for political projects with partner organizations, and a capstone project the following academic year. Based on the nationally-recognized leadership development model, Service Opportunities in Leadership (SOL), a signature program of Hart Leadership, PEPP will combine academic study with field-based service projects, intensive leadership development, and mentoring—all with a focus on political engagement. Application information: http://ow.ly/TAZ92 [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Inquiries/Competencies: EI] LIMITED TO 15 STUDENTS & PERMISSION REQUIRED

PPS 263.01 – BORDER CROSSING: LEADERSHIP, VALUE CONFLICTS & PUBLIC LIFE

Tuesday/Thursday 10:05 - 11:20 am; Wednesday 10:20 - 11:10 am, Rubenstein 149

Instructor: Alma Blount

Border Crossing is a preparation course for students who plan to conduct community-based research projects or other service projects for community partner organizations in the U.S. or abroad.   The course is designed to provide students with theoretical knowledge and critical reflection skills for entering diverse cultures and communities. Students will receive training in basic research methods, and conduct a service-learning project in the spring for a local organization. Students will also explore a leadership framework for analyzing complex problem-solving work that involves learning to work with values conflicts productively—in order mobilize groups, institutions and systems to do difficult work. The Border Crossing course has traditionally been the gateway course for Service Opportunities in Leadership (SOL), a signature program in Hart Leadership Program. In 2016 SOL will be on hiatus while Hart Leadership Program faculty implement the Political Engagement Pilot Project. Because of student demand, however, the Border Crossing course will still be offered this spring as a leadership seminar. Application information: http://ow.ly/TAOoV [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Inquiries/Competencies: EI, R, W] LIMITED TO 15 STUDENTS & PERMISSION REQUIRED

PPS 302D – POLICY CHOICE AS VALUE CONFLICT

Tuesday/Thursday 1:25 - 2:40 pm, Sanford 04

Instructor: Robert Korstad

This course will look at the moral and ethical challenges posed by inequality in the United States from European settlement to the present. The goal is to understand the roots of the many inequities we see in our society today. We will investigate the topic through the lenses of housing, education, healthcare, municipal services, employment, politics and criminal justice, and we will also explore the leadership dimensions of these challenges throughout the semester. The course will be divided into four sections: Part I: Colonization and Enslavement, 1600-1865; Part II: The Long Gilded Age, 1865-1929; Part III: The Great Compression, 1929-1972; and Part IV: The Great Divergence, 1972-Present. Class meetings will consist of lectures, film and video clips, and discussion. There is also a required discussion section each week that will be led by students. These sections will provide a chance to go into more depth on the issues raised in class and well as to discuss how the past is implicated in the present.  [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Inquiries/Competencies: EI]

PPS 590S.09 – THE REPUBLICAN PARTY AND ITS FUTURE

Tuesday/Thursday 1:25 - 2:40 pm, Sanford 150

Instructor: Marty Morris

For 35 years Marty Morris worked in Republican politics, as a statewide campaign manager, consultant to a presidential campaign, and Chief of Staff for Senator Dick Lugar.  In this course, students will look at the evolution of the party of Lincoln and investigate the forces that now make up the Republican Party.  Students will explore where they stand, as citizens and as possible future office holders, on many of the complex issues facing the GOP today.  Students will be introduced to useful tools of the political trade.  They will look at policy theories that have worked in the past and might work again in the future. The class will attempt to answer the question, where should the Republican Party go from here? [Areas of Knowledge: SS]

HISTORY 130D – AMERICAN DREAMS/AMERICAN REALITIES

Monday /Wednesday 11:45 - 12:35 pm, Social Sciences 136

Instructor: Gerald Wilson

This seminar will examine the role of such myths as "rags to riches," "beacon to the world," the "frontier" and the "foreign devil" in defining the American character and determining the hopes, fears, dreams and actions of people throughout American History. Also, attention is given to the surface consistency of these myths as accepted by each immigrant group versus the shifting content of the myths as they change to reflect the hopes and values of each of these groups. [Areas of Knowledge: CZ; Inquiries/Competencies: R]  

HISTORY 470S – LEADERSHIP IN AMERICAN HISTORY

Tuesday/Thursday 3:05 - 4:20 pm, location TBD

Instructor: Gerald Wilson

The seminar will focus on political, social, business, and artistic leaders \in American history and problems which have called for leadership. In addition to selected short reading, students will examine closely the following: James MacGregor Burns’ "Leadership"; Walter Clark’s "Ox Bow Incident"; Niccolo Machiavelli’s "The Prince"; May and R. Neustadt’s "Thinking in Time"; Robert Penn Warren’s "All the King's Men"; Gary Wills’ "Certain Trumpets"; and David Gergen’s "Eyewitness to Power."  [Areas of Knowledge: SS, Inquiries/Competencies: EI, R] PERMISSION REQUIRED

PPS260.01 – LEADERSHIP, POLICY, AND CHANGE

Tuesday/Thursday, 10:05-11:20, Sanford 225

Instructor: Steve Schewel

This is a course about leading political change. Together we will tackle two critical and intimately related aspects of this leadership. First, we will examine the challenge of making courageous moral choices in the public realm. Then we will study the crucial role of social movements in creating change. Throughout, we will ask these questions: How can we ourselves best contribute to the great social movements of our time? How can we ourselves help lead political change?   We will answer these questions against the backdrop of the 2016 presidential election, and we will pay close attention to the race as it reaches its climax in November. We will consider the moral and political choices of the candidates, and we will consider how their campaigns advance or hinder social movements in making political change. We will also consider the public moral choices of well-known historical figures and characters in fiction and film. We’ll study the psychology of obedience, acquiescence and resistance, and we’ll inspect the conscience and actions of public dissenters from the abolitionists to NSA whistle-blowers.   Then we will turn our attention to the historical role of social movements in making political change. We’ll examine the creators of the American Revolution. We’ll follow the young people who led the Civil Rights Movement. We’ll see the Second Wave of the Women’s Movement close up. We'll examine the Trump phenomenon as an authentic movement of committed activists.   Through the lens of this history, we will take stock of our own potential to lead political change from positions of authority or from the grassroots. We will think about how to raise difficult public questions, to go beyond our own authority to push for change, to find partners and build alliances, to manage value conflicts, to provide a vision of a possible future, and to involve our communities in the difficult work of political engagement and collective action. [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Inquiries/Competencies: EI]

PPS271.S.01 – SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP IN ACTION

Tuesday 3:05 - 5:35 pm, Sanford 102

Instructor: Tony Brown

Social Entrepreneurship in Action is a leadership course in applied social innovation.  The central goal of the course is to provide students with an academic opportunity to leverage their experiences and interests to create social innovation initiatives.  More than a traditional social entrepreneurship education course, the course design is based on the principle that significant learning and development are results of creating projects that will actually benefit others.  The course integrates theory and practice (more practice to theory than vice-versa) in providing students with knowledge, analytical competence, and leadership skills important to exercising social entrepreneurship.  Teams of students will develop a promising idea, followed sequentially by a credible proposal and a compelling plan.  Following the end of the course, many students will pilot-test and subsequently launch projects that become signature accomplishments. MARKETS AND MANAGEMENT CERTIFICATE – CORE COURSE, SERVICE-LEARNING COURSE [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Inquiries/Competencies: EI] PERMISSION REQUIRED: Open to sophomores (and juniors on an exception basis).

PPS415.01 – ADAPTIVE LEADERSHIP

Wednesday 4:40 - 7:10 pm, Sanford 150

Instructor: Alma Blount

This is the capstone course for students who will have completed internships or community-based research projects during the summer of 2016 that were sponsored by the Hart Leadership Program, or by other curricular or co-curricular programs at Duke University.  Organized around a weekly dinner, the Adaptive Leadership seminar explores leadership as the art of mobilizing groups to face complex, systemic problems.  Through case studies of social and political issues, we will investigate the demands of public problem-solving work.   Students will have the opportunity to reflect critically their summer work with partner organizations, and to integrate what they have been learning with concepts of leadership, politics, and public policy. Our focus will be case studies of adaptive problems that are systemically complicated, yet are shaped by compelling human narratives that draw us in, and show us what is at stake.  The first eight weeks of the course will utilize documentary films, non-fiction narrative writing, and stories from the news for the case studies.   A central requirement of the course is the completion of a comprehensive research portfolio about a social or political issue of each student’s choice. Our work together will involve intensive group learning.  The iterative process of building the portfolio will take place throughout the semester, and during the second part of the course students will present their research to the class.   This is a course about the leadership demands of important, seemingly intractable problems that are interdependent in nature.  A key part of the learning process will involve students testing the adaptive analysis framework so that they can become proficient with it.  Throughout the semester we will pay careful attention to both the challenges and the rewards of engaging in adaptive work.  Participants will have ample opportunities to develop insights about their own adaptive leadership skills, and how they can enhance them. [Areas of Knowledge: SS; Inquiries/Competencies: EI, W, R] PERMISSION REQUIRED

HISTORY 130D.001 – AMERICAN DREAMS/AMERICAN REALITIES

Monday/Wednesday 11:45 - 12:35 pm, Social Sciences 136

Instructor: Gerald Wilson

What does it mean to be an “American?” A  French political scientist said, “To be a Frenchman is a fact; to be an American is an ideal.” What commonly shared ideals, ideas, “myths” define us as “Americans?”  This course examines the role of some commonly shared myths as “rags to riches,” the “agrarian way of life,” the “frontier,” the “foreign devils” and the “City on a Hill” in defining the American character and determining our hopes, fears, dreams and actions through our history. Attention will be given to the surface consistency of these myths as accepted by each immigrant group versus the shifting content of the myths as they change to reflect the hopes and values of each of these groups. [Areas of Knowledge: CZ; Inquiries/Competencies: CCI]

HISTORY 470S.01 – LEADERSHIP IN AMERICAN HISTORY

Tuesday/Thursday 3:05 - 4:20 pm, Social Psychology 128

Instructor: Gerald Wilson

The seminar will focus on political, social, business, and artistic leaders in American history and problems which have called for leadership. In addition to selected short readings, students will examine closely the following: James MacGregor Burns’ "Leadership"; Walter Clark’s "Ox Bow Incident"; Niccolo Machiavelli’s "The Prince"; May and R. Neustadt’s "Thinking in Time"; Robert Penn Warren’s "All the King's Men"; Gary Wills’ "Certain Trumpets"; and David Gergen’s "Eyewitness to Power." [Areas of Knowledge: CZ; Inquiries/Competencies: EI, R] Permission Required

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